War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0750 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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Millner as appear by the affidavits of the U. S. marshal, Robert Murray, and John S. Young, of New York, are as follows, viz: One Bethel Burton, of Brooklyn, N. Y., was the inventor of a patent rifle. Millner was a speculator with means, and having made the acquaintance of Burton the two went to Richmond, Va., and contracted with the reble authorities to supply them with 40,000 to 50,000 of the rifles. They returned to New York, purchased the machinery and hired men to manfuacture the guns, and when arrested were nearly ready to ship the machinery andmen to Virginia. At the time of the arrest Millner was in the act of paying $15,000 to Burton for an interest in the gun and contract. About the 1st of November, 1861, Millner was transferred to Fort Warren and remained in custody February 15, 1862.

Robert R. Walker was arrested by John A. Kennedy, superintendent of New York police, September 11, 1861, and by order of the Secretary of State committed to Fort Lafayette. He was charged with being engaged in a scheme to furnish Burton's rifle to the rebels in insurection against the United States. An order was issued from the Department of State dated October 17, 1861, directing Colonel Martin Burke, commanding at Fort Lafayette, to release Walker on his taking the oath stipulating that he will neither enter the insurrectionary States nor correspond with persons residing therein nor do any act hostile to the United States during the present insurrection. He was accordingly released October 19, 1861.

Bethel Burton, of Brooklyn, N. Y., was arrested by U. S. Marshal Murray, of New York, September 12, 1861, and by direction of the Secretary of State was committed t from whence he was transferred to Fort Warren about the 1st of November, 1861. The charges against Burton as appear by the affidavits of U. S. Marshal Murray and John S. Young, of New York, are as follows: That Burton was the inventor of a patent rifle and having made the acquaintance of one J. K. Millner, of Virginia, a speuclator and a man of means, in pursuance of an arrangement made between them the two went to Richmond, Va., with a sample gun and contracted with the insurgent authorities there to supply them with from 40,000 to 50,000 of the rifles. They returned to New York, purchased machinery and hired men to manufacture the guns, and when arrested were nearly ready to ship the machinery and men to Virginia. The said Bethel Burton remained in custody at Fort Warren February 15, 1862, when inc onformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

The first information received at the Department of State in regard to this person [B. F. Corlies] was from U. S. Marshal Murray, of New York, September 12, 1861, stating that he had arrested Corlies on the charge of printing bank bills for the rebels, and that the evidence against him was conclusive. By order of the Secretary of State Corlies was committed to Fort Lafayette. September 17, 1861, an order was issued from the Department of State directing Lieutenant Colonel Burke, commanding at Fort Lafayette, to release Corlies on his taking the oath of allegiance. The said B. F. Corlies was accordingly released September 18, 1861. -From Record Book, State Department, "Arrests for Disloyalty. "