War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0718 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, February 5, 1862.

Colonel JUSTIN DIMICK, Fort Warren, Boston.

SIR: Let John C. Brain, a prisoner confined in Fort Warren, be released on stipulating upon oath that he will neither enter any of the States in insurrection against the authority of the United States Government norhold any correspondence whatever with persons residing in those States without permission from the Secretary of State; and also that he will not do anything hostile to the United States during the present insurrection.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.

FORT WARREN, Boston Harbor, February 10, 1862.

I, John C. Brain, a prisoner confined in Fort Warren, do solemnly swear that I will neither enter any of the States in insurrection against the authority of the United States Government nor hold any correspondencewhatever with persons residing in those States without permission from the Secretary of State; and also that I will not do anything hostile to the United States during the present insurrection. So help me God.

JOHN C. BRAIN.

Subscribed and sworn to this 10th day of February, A. D. 1862, before me at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor.

J. DIMICK,

Colonel First Artillery and Brevet Colonel, Commanding Post.

WASHINGTON, March 1, 1862.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD, &c.

SIR: I have received a letter from John C. Brain, who informed me that he has been released from prison and bets me to make inquirries concrning a sum of $220 which he states to have been taken from him when he was arrested.

You may perhaps remember that reference was made to this sum of money in a dispatch from Her Majesty's consul at New York to me dated the 23rd of October which I left with you for perusal on the 26th of that month, and which you were so good as to return to me on thesame day. It was stated in that dispatch that Mr. Brain had informed theconsul that a sum of $220 in gold was taken from him at Camp Colfax, in Indiana, by a private soldier by order of a captain; that no acknowledgment was given to him for the money and that he was very desirous that inquiry should be made concerning its safety.

Brain now informsme that it was Captain Blake, of the Ninth Indiana Regiment, who took charge of the sum in question. He states further that after an imprisonment of nearly six months he is turned out entirely destitute of money and suffering from a severe rheumatic attack brought on by confinement and by sleeping during nine days on a stone floor.

I beg to recommend the matter to your attention and to express a hope that the money may be restored to this poor man without delay.

I have the honor to be, with high consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

LYONS.