War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0692 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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can quell treason much easier than we can in our small villages and country places. I am very certain that it is not yet safe to turn traitors loos among us. If Elliot were my own father or brother and had been guilty of what he has I should want him kept safely till the war is over or nearly so. Governor Washburn has the impression that Elliot will be released before long whether he (Washburn) asks for it or not. I will only say further that in my judgment seven-eights of our loyal citizens and best men tthink he should not be permitted to associate with our people again at present. I write this with reluctance but from a sense of duty to the Government. If he could be released as a favor to him and his family without being an injury to the Government it would give me great pleasure to see it done for I am a strong friend to his family, but I am a stronger friend to my country and my glorious Government.

I am, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

EBENEZER KNOWLTON.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 2, 1861.

Colonel JUSTIN DIMICK, Fort Warren, Boston, Mass.

SIR: Let Robert Elliot, a prisoner confined in Fort Warren, be released on taking the oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States stipulating that he will neither enter any of the States in insurrection against the authority of the United Staes Government nor hold any correspondence whatever with persons residing in those States without permission from the Secretary of Stae; and also that he will not do anything hostile to the United States during the present insurection. You will please make the stipulations a part of the oath. I transmit this order to John S. Keyes, esq., U. S. marshal, who has been instructed by this Department to cause a police examination to be made in some cases of the persons and baggage of prisoners discharged from custody to the ened that no correspondence or other improper papers be conveyed by them to perseons outside the fort.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

I, Robert Elliot, do solemnly swear that I will support, protect and defend the Constitution and Government of the United States against all enemies whether domestic or foreign, and that I will bear true faith, allegiance and loyalty to the same, any ordinance, resolution or law of any State convention or legislature to the contrary notwithstanding; and further that I do this with a full determination, pledge and purposntal reservation or evasion whatsoever; and further that I will well and faithfully perform all the duties which may be reqired of me by law, hereby stipulating that I will neither enter any of the States in insurrection against the authority of the United States Government nor hold any correspondence whatever with persons residing in those States nor transmit any correspondence between disloyal persons without permission of the Secretary of State, and also that I will not do anything hostile to the United States during the present insurrection. So help me God.

ROBERT ELLIOT.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this the 7th day of November, A. D. 1861.

J. DIMICK.

Colonel, U. S. Army.