War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0660 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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It may now become a matter for the two Governments to settle. Meantime I may have to suffer my liberty and be otherwise subjected to dishonorable imputations, not to name what I am other ways losing in a domestic and pecuniary way from my long confinement, up to this time now nearly two months, which may be extended to an indefinite time. I urge you therefore to again write or see Mr. Seward and if need be employ the additional assistance of Edwin M. Stanton, who I know to have influence at Washington.

Very respectfully,

ROBT. MURE,

Of Charleston, S. C.

Let me hear from you soon either direct or through Mr. McGowan. The rules of this fort demand that no portion of this letter be published.

R. M.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, October 15, 1861.

Lieutenant Colonel MARTIN BURKE, Fort Lafayette, N. Y.

SIR: Let Robert Mure, a prisoner confined at Fort Lafayette, be released on engaging upon his honor that he will neither enter any of the States in insurrection against the authority of the United States Government nor hold any correspondence wahtever with persons residing in those States without permission from the Secretary of State. And also that he will not do any act hostile or injurious to the United States during the present insurrection. I transmit this order to Robert Murray, esq., U. S. marshal, who has been instructed by this Department to cause a police examination to be made in some cases of the perons and baggage of prisoners discharged fromcustody to the end that no correspondence or other improper papers be conveyed by them to persons outside the fort.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

FORT HAMILTON, N. Y. October 17, 1861

I, Robert Mure, do hereby engage on my honor not to enter any of the States in insurrection against the authority of the United States Government nor hold any correspondence whatever with persons residing in those States without permission from the Secretary of State; and also that I will do no act hostile or injurious to the United States during the present insurrection.

ROBT. MURE.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, October 23, 1861.

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, Esq., &c.

SIR: I recur once more to your dispatch of September 14. On the 3rd of that month you addressed a note to Earl Russell in which you informed him by my direction that fromteh contents of the many letters found in the possession of Mr. Robert Mure, bearer of dispatches to the Government of Great Britain but detained at New York as an agent of the enemies of the United States, the following statement is made of the action of Mr. Bunch in Charleston:

Mr. Bunch on oath of secrecy communicated to me also that the first to recognition was taken; that he and Mr. Belligny together sent Mr. Trescot to Richmond