War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0499 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

Search Civil War Official Records

OFFICE OF THE SUPT. OF THE METROPOLITAN POLICE,

New York, October 19, 1861.

Honorable W. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: I have sent you one copy of every issue of the National Zeitung with a single exception. I infer you have not received them from what I learned of the fate of other papers sent to your office. I therefore notify you that the Zeitung of this day is posted with this letter.

Very truly, yours,

JOHN A. KENNEDY,

Superintendent.

[Translation of parts of the National Zeitung, October 19.]

THE CONFEDERATE STATES AND ENGLAND AND FRANCE.

Various circumstances assure that the recognition of the Confederate States by England and France is already as good as settled. The freeing of Missoury from the Northern force, or anyuthing favorable to the Confederates indicating power to sustain themselves, would without question cause the blow to be struck. All ready for the occasion are Younk, Ross, Butler, &c., and two regular envoyus, Slidel and Mason, gone to Europe. * * * They have run the (paper) blockade. * * * Some Lincolnite war vessels have been sent after them from New York. * * * Their capture would not alter things at all. * * * Frane and England and the Confederate States are doubtless agreed that the latter should send properly authorized envoys. * * * it happens that about the same time Sir J. Ferguson, of the English Parliament, appears at Richmond with letters to Jeff. Davis, &c., and indicates him to be the bearer of important dispatches. * * * The cabinet shares the suspicion (of this understanding) and in its wavering malignity or blindness believes it should make preparation for war with those powers. Seward's sudden circular * * * enlightens us on this point. It is possible many simple-minded citizens would ask, Would the Government undertake at the same time war with England, France and the Confederates? Is it possible a Government chosen by the people would plunge that people into utter and absolute ruin? It can only be answered, The Government we now have is capable of anything.

A DREADFUL ILLUSTRATION.

The London Times sets forth the condition of Mexico: "The Republic in fact no longer exists. " The Zeitung remarks: "The whole course and declared purposes of the abolitionists indicate that they, if their rebellion succeeds, intend a like fate for this people. Is it yet too late to put a stop to this?

BUT HOW?

Taking a distincton as to quarrels in the Geman and Swiss Confederacies as quarrels of prices and not of the people, the Zeitung remarks:

"Who has eyes must see that our calamity, this satanic civil war, springs from the unholy intermeddling of the Northern abolitionists with the relatios of slavery which pertain exclusively to the South, and which they cannot forego but with which the North has no more