War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0497 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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you will furnish me with the names of one or two persons whose arrest would be likely to produce a proper effect upon the course of that paper I will communicate a decision upon the subject. * * *

I am, very truly, yours,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

OFFICE OF THE SUPT. OF THE METRROPOLITAN POLICE,

New York, September 22, 1861.

Honorable W. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: On returning on Thursday I found yours of 17th on my table. I have already sent you the number of the National Zeitung of the Saturday previous which was forwarded to me in Baltimore, an by it you may perceive that no change has taken place in its character. The number issued yesterday has not yet reached me, but I will have it to-day and forward it. The chief editor of the National Zeitung is O. Bengue, and probably his arrest would be sufficeint for the whole; if it would not I will give you the names of some of the committee of managememtn who are most active in furnishing editorial matter for it. The other German papers are now nearly right. The Staats Zeitung has turned over since the Westchester presentment and is advicating Mr. Lincoln on the point at issue with General Fremont. The other German papers susstain Fremont's side.

Truly, yours,

JOHN A. KENNEDY,

Superintendent.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, September 24, 1861.

JOHN A. KENNEDY, Esq.,

Superintendent of Police, New York.

SIR: Your letter of the 22nd relative to the National Zeitung has been received and I will wait for the receipt of the additional papeer mentioned by you before taking furtherr steps in the matter.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

OFFICE OF THE SUPT. OF THE METROPOLITAN POLICE,

New York, September 29, 1861.

SIR: In relation to the National Zeitung I have to say that I posted a copy of the issue of 21st instant at the same time my letter of 22nd was posted. Yesterday I sent you a copy of that day's issue. I fing it in no manner disposed to slacken its virulence. The numbeer of yesterday is in some respects more hurtful than any of its predecessors. But you can judge of that by a perusal better than I can inform you, receiving as I do the translation from highly excited. Gemans who desire the whole committee of publication to be hanged. It appears to me, however, that the arrest is called for of O. Bengue, the editer in chief, and Hepke or Korn, the business men of the concern, and one other

32 R R-SERIES II, VOL II