War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0430 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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somewhat soothed by the conviction that you saw from an erroneous standpoint and knew not the true character of the obligation. There are no contemplated combination of circumstances which could induce me to waver from the position I have taken. Kidnaped as I have been I will not wink at any further degradation. The fact that I was arrested because this Government thought I was on my way South to take up arms against the United States makes me at least a quasi prisoner of war. The South has adopted no policy upon the question of exchange. The South has given up her military prisoners for political prisoners held in this fort; witness Faulkner* for Ely and the resigned navy officers who were arrested as and held as prisoners of state. Every guaranteed right of this Government disregarded or denied me I now appeal with an abiding confidence to my native land.

Very affectionately, your devoted son,

AUSTIN E. SMITH.

Warmest love to all. Please carry out my views and leave the rest to me.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Richmond, March 31, 1862.

President DAVIS.

DEAR SIR: A recent capture of some citizen prisoners from the enemy afford some chances of extricating my son from his imprisonment in Fort Warren. Allow me to call your attention again to this matter, deeply interesting to me, and implore again your interference for my dear son's extrication.

Yours, most respectfully,

WM. SMITH.

[First indorsement.]

SECRETARY OF WAR:

The case is a hard one and Colonel Smith has the highest claim on our regard. His devotion and gallantry are known to you. His son has shown a spirit worthy his descent. If the request can be consistently complied with you will please avail yourself of an opportunity to grant it.

J. D[AVIS].

[Second indorsement.]

Inform Honorable William Smith, House of Representatives, that if he can suggest a suitable exchange the Department will c onsider the suggestion with a cordial wish to adopt it.

G. W. R[ANDOLHP].

CARY STREET CITIZENS' PRISON,

Richmond, April 10, 1862.

Ex-Governor WILLIAM SMITH.

DEAR SIR: Since the brief interview of yesterday I have revolved in my mind the subject of procuring the exchange of your son, A. E. Smith, for myself, and I will now specifically set forth some of the influences I can bring to accomplish that result.

First. My uncle, Mr. Robert Allen, of Philadelphia, is a most intimate friend of Mr. John Tucker, one of the Assistant Secretaries of

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*See p. 463 for case of Faulkner, exchanged for Congressman Ely, of New York.

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