War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0381 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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had been lying in wait for the capture of other steamers from Baltimore, has been taken possession of and is now at the dock of this port, having been run aground and deserted by the crew. No capture of rebels was made on board of her.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Baltimore, Md., September 5, 1861.

Major General G. B. McCLELLAN,

Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: * * * Two of these prisoners are confined for piracy. One is the celebrated Thomas or Colonel Zarvona, commonly known as the French lady. He is of one of the first families in Maryland; is rich, intelligent and resolute. His nervous system is much broken by confinement and want of active occupation and he has made earnest appeals to me for the privilege of walking about the garrison within the walls on his parole of honor not to attempt to escape. These is no doubt it would be sacredly respected. I have not thought proper to extend the indulgence to him, though I think his health requires it, without your direction. * * *

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, September 10, 1861.

Major General JOHN A. DIX, U. S. Army,

Commanding, &c., Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Md.

SIR: Your letters of the 5th and 8th instant to Major-General McClellan on the subject of the prisoners confined in Fort McHenry have been referred to the General-in-Chief who directs me to reply as follows: * * * In regard to the prisoner Thomas the general does not think it prudent to extend his liberty. * * *

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TONWSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Baltimore, Md., September 11, 1861.

WILLIAM MEADE ADDISON, U. S. District Attorney.

SIR: We have several witnesses detained in the case of Thomas. What is the extent of our control over them? Are they entitled to pay while detained? They are restive and were disorderly and Colonel Morris in consequence put them in a cell by night and on fatigue duty by day. They are soilors and are not very well contended on dry land. If they are entitled to pay how can they get it? Some of them have families, and as they are deprived by their detention of the power of earning, anything they think the Government should pay them so that their wives and children may no suffer.

Respecptfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.