War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0354 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 31, 1861.

Colonel JUSTIN DIMICK, Fort Warren, Boston.

SIR: Let R. H. Alvey, a prisoner confined in Fort Warren, be released on taking an oath that he will support the Constitution and laws of the United States and commit no act of hostily against the Government thereof, and that during the continuance of the present war he will not go into any of the seceeded States or hold any communication with persons therein; and further that he will hold himself in readiness to return to any place of confinement or imprisonment at any moment he may be required so to do by the Government of the United States or by any of its properly constitued officers.

I am, si, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.

FORT WARREN, Boston Harbor, January 6, 1862.

I, R, H. Alvey, a prisoner confined in Fort Warren, do solemnly swear that I will support the Constitution and laws of the United States and that I will not commit any act of hostility against the Government thereof, and that during the continuance of the presen war I will not go into any of the seceded States or hold any communication with persons therein; and further that I will hold myself in readines to return to any place of confinement or imprisonment at any moment I may be required so to do by the Government of the United States or by any of its properly constituted officers. So help me God.

R. H. ALVEY.

Sworn to and subscribed before me at Fort Warren, Boston Harbor,

Mass., this the 6th day of January, A. D. 1861.

J. DIMICK,

Colonel First Artillery and Brevet Colonel, Commanding Post.

Case of John S. Emerson.

John S. Emerson was arrested by Lieutenant C. H. Shepard, provost-marshal of Alexandria, and committed to the city jail, Washington, by order of General Mansfield June 23, 1861. Emerson was formerly from Memphis where he was employed as steam-boat captain on the western and Mississippi rivers. He left there in May and came to Alexandria, passing himself off as Lieutenant Hill, of the Sixth Massachusetts, and claimed to have been wounded while passing through Baltimore with that regiment. He mingled with the officers and men, talking with the sentimels, and seemed desirous of ascertaining the position and strength of the Union forces in and about Alexandria. His conduct was so suspicious that he was finally arrested as a spy and committed as stated above. He was released on taking the oath of allegiancve October 17, 1861, by order of the Secretary of State. -

From Record Book, State Department, "Arrests for Disloyalty. "

WASHINGTON, D. C., October 8, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON.

SIR: I have been confiend in the jail of this city by order of General Mansfield over three months and I would respectfully appeal to you in