War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0344 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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in Kentucky, furnishing them with rifles and medicines. U. S. Marshal Phillips, of Illinois, states in a letter addressed to the Secretary of State January 24, 1862, that the evidence of the guilty practices of O'Leary and his associates is clear and unquestionable. The said Thomas O' Leary remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

John Rigal was arrested by order of State at Olney, Ill., January 28, 1862, by the U. S. marshal of that State and conveyed to Fort Lafayette. He was charged with having been engaged with others in carrying on a countraband trade with the rebels in Kentucky, furnishing them with rifles and medicines. U. S. Marshal Phillips, of Illinois, in a letter addressed to the Secretary of State January 24, 1862, states that the evidence of the guilty practices of Rigal and his associates is clear and unquestionable. The said John Rigal remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

Representations having been received from the U. S. marshal of the southern district of Illinois that certain parties in that district were disloyal and carrying on an illegal traffic with the insurrectionary States an order was issued from the Department of State January 28, 1862, to U. S. Marshal Phillips for their arrest. The U. S. marshal reported by telegraph that he had made the arrests mentioned and also seized a Mrs. H. M. Wood and William Smith and asking what he should do with them. In reply the Secretary of State directed the marshal to take them all to Fort Lafayette. The said William Smith remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

Mrs. H. M. Wood, of Nashville, Tenn., or Hopkinsville, Ky., was arrested in Illinois about the 28th of January, 1862, by U. S. Marshal D. L. Phillips, of that State, and by order of the Secretary of State was conveyed to Washington, D. C., and there placed under surveillance. She was charged with having procured in New York with the aid of others material for a paper mill and was conveying the same South for the use of the insurgents. The said Mrs. H. M. Wood remained under surveillance in Washington, D. C., February 15, 1852, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day she was trasnferred to the charge of that Department. (Released on giving parole to report to Seth C. Hawley, New York, and give testimony before the grand jury February 20, 1862. Reported to S. C. Hawley February 23, 1862.)

The first information received at the Department of State relative to this person [Cornelius P. Havens] was a letter dated January 28, 1862, to the Secretary of State in which said Havens asked to be released from Fort Lafayette. It appears that he was captured on the prize schooner Venus in the Gulf of Mexico and claimed to have been a passenger. The date of the capture of the Vwas committed to Fort Lafayette has not been received at the Department of State. The said Conrelius P. Havens remained in custody February 15, 1862, at Fort Lafayette.