War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0343 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYALTY PERSONS.

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Robert W. Buckles was arrested by order of the Secretary of State at Olney, Ill., January 28, 1862, by the U. S. marshal of that State and conveyed to Fort Lafayette. He was charged with having been engaged with others in carrying on a contraband trade with the rebels in Kentucky, furnishing them with rifles and medicines. U. S. Marshal Phillips, of Illinois, states in a letter to the Secretary of State dated January 24, 1862, that the evidence of the guilty practices of Buckles and his associates is clear and unquestionable. The said Tobert W. Buckles remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with an order of the War Depatrment of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of the War Department.

O. Norris Bryan was arrested January 28, 1862, at his home in Charles county, Md., by order of the Secretary of State on complaint of L. C. Baker and confined in the Old Capitol. His secession proclivities were proved from several letter accompanying the report of his arrest all of which contain strong rebel sentiments. Samuel Barker testifies that he knows Bryan well and that he has often heard him abuse the United States Government in the bitterest manner and express for the Confederate States the warmest sympathy. These expressions were made in the most public manner on the steam - boat Thomas Colyer. Before and after his arrest he refused to take the oath of allegiance. The said Bryan remained in custody at the Old Capitol Prison February 15, 1862, when in preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

John Hipkins, Jr., alias Edward R. Platt, was arrested by order of the Secretary of the Navy and conveyed to Fort Lafayette January 28, 1862. This person shipped in the U. S. service on the Sloop - of - war Vincennes but afterward refused to fight for the Government, alleging that his paarents lived in Virginia and he could not fight against the rebels of that State. the said John Hipkins remained in custody in Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with an order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

Thomas Mathews was arrested by order of the Secretary of State at Oleny, Ill., January 28, 1862, by the U. S. marshal of that State and vonveyed to Fort Lafayette. He was charge with having been engaged with others in carrying on a contraband trade with the rebels in Kentucky, furnishing them with rifles and medicines. U. S. Marshal Phillips, of Illinois, states in a letter addressed to the Secretary of State January 24, 1862, that the evidence of the guilty practices of Mathews and his associates is clear and unquestionable. The said Thomas Mathews remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department. (Ordered released February 21, 1862. Released on parole February 22, 1862.)

Thomas O'Leary was arrested by order of the Secretary of State at Oleny, Ill., January 28, 1862, by the U. S. marshal of that State and conveyed to Fort Lafayette. He was charged with having been engaged with others in carrying on a contraband trade with the rebels