War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0337 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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there were several prisoners of war confined at Camp Chase whose friends in Virginia has presented petitions for their release on their taking the oath of allegiance. some of them were civilians who had been arrested on some suspicious conduct of little consequence and others charged with having belonged to rebel roganization although not so when captured. The Secretary of State wrote January 28, 1862, asking of Lieutenant - Colonel Hoffman particulats as to the charges against these prisoners and names. Hoffman replied by letter of February 11 that before he could make the requested inquiries Henderson and the other men had been released, though by whose authority he was not able to state.

Thomas H. Haislip was arrested by General Heitzelman January 13, 1862, and committed to the Old Capitol Prison. There are no papers on file in the Department of State showing the charges against this man. He remained in prison February 15, 1862, when in conformity with an order from the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department. (Released on parole not to leave the District February 22, 1862.)

George M. Gormey, of Norfolk, Va., was confined in the Old Capitol Prison in Washington on the 13th day of January, 1862, having been received as a prisoner from the Navy Department on that day. A report made by E. J. Allen through General Porter, provost - marshal of Washington, states that Gormley was arrested while attempting to cross the Potomac River in a boat by a boat's crew from the cutter Howell Cobb at 12. 30 a. m. January 11, 1862. That the next day in company with Rev. Bennett Smedes and John E. Rea who were captured at the same time he was transferred to the Island Belle; thence to Colonel Graham's headquarters; thence successively to the U. S. vessels Wyandand, Harriet Lame and Yankee on board of which latter he was taken to the provost - marshal's office. Gormley and two companions are also shown to have been talking secession shortly before they were taken. The said Gormley remained in custody at the Old Capitol Prison February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the war Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

(Released March 26, 1862.)

The first information that the Department of State has of the arrest of this man [G. A. Davis] was communicated in a letter from Lieutenant col. W. Hoffman, commissary - general of prisoners, of January 13, 1862, addressed to Adjutant - General Thomas which letter was referred to the Secretary of State. It stated that there were several prisoners of war confined at Camp Chase whose friends in Virginia had presented petitions for their release on taking the oath of allegiance. Some of them were civilians who had been committed on some suspicious conduct of little importance had others charged with having belonged to rebel irganizations, although not so when arrested. The Secretary of State wrote January 28, 1862, asking of Lieutenant - Colonel Hoffman the names and particulars of charges against them. Hoffman replied by letter of February 11, 1862, that before he could make the requested inquiries Davis and the other prisoners had been discharged, although by whose authority he was not able to state. This correspondence may be found in an envelope marked Camp Chase.

22 R R - SERIES II, VOL II