War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0328 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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This person [J. Q. A. Bulter] was master of the schooner Lida, which was captured by the U. S. steamer Saint Lawrence at Port Royal. U. S. Marshal Murray, of New York, in a letter to the Secretary of State dated December 19, 1861, states that the master and crew of the prize schooner Lida have been placed in his custody upon a charge of running the blockade and asking what he shall do with them. December 28, 1861, an order was issued from the Department of state directing U. S. Marshal Murray to release from custody J. Q. A. Bulter and others of the crew of the Lida. The said Bulter was accordingly released.

This man [William Brown] was taken from the steamer Lewis while attempting to run the blockede by the U. S. gun - boat New London off Mobile. He was brought to New York by the U. S. steamer Connecticut and delivered into the custody of Robert Murray, U. S. marshal, about December 19, 1861. An order was issued from the Department of State dated December 28, 1861, directing Robert Murray, U. S. marshal, New York, to release William Brown on his taking an oath that he will neither enter any of the States in insurrection against the Government of the United States nor hold any correspondence with persons residing therein, without permission, &c., and stipulating that he will do no act hostile to the Government of the United States. He was accordingly released about December 31, 1861.

Caspar or Gaspar Klock was taken off the steamer Lewis while attempting to run the blockade by the U. S. gun -boat New London. He was brought to New York by the U. S. steamer Connecticut and delivered into the custody of Marshal Robert Murray about December 19, 1861. An order was issued from the State Department dated December 28, 1861, directing Robert Murray, esq., to release Klock on his taking an oath that he will neither enter any of the States in insurrection nor hold any correspondence with persons residing in those States without permission of the Secretary of State and stipulating to do no act hostile to the Government of the United States. He was released about December 31, 1861.

U. S. Marshal Murray, of New York, by letter dated December 19, 1861, informed the Secretary of State that Arthur McAbey and others of the crew of the prize schooner Lida, which vessel was captured near Port Royal, had been place in his custody, and asking what should be done with him. December 28, 1861, an order was issued from the Departmetn of State directing U. S. Marshal Murray to release Mcabey and others of the crew of the Lida. The sid Arthur McAbey was accordingly released.

Mrs. Rachel Mayer was arrested by a Government agent at Rouse's Point, N. Y., and by order of the Secretary of State dated December 19, 1861, placed under surveillance in New York city. She was charged with being the bearer of treasonable or clandestine correspondence for the South. An order was issued from the Department of State dated January 3, 1862, directing John A. Kennedy, superintendent of police, New York, to release Mrs. Mayer on engaging that she will neither enter any of the States in insurrection against the authority of the United states Government nor hold any correspondence whatever with persons residing in those States without permission from the Secretary