War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0303 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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George P. Pressy of Saint Louis, Mo., was arrested in Marion County, Ky., on or about the 20th day of September, 1861, charged with aiding the rebellion against the United States. He was probably taken by the Kentucky Home Guard or by order of General Anderson, thought there are no documents in the State Department showing any of the particulars in relation to his arrest or commitment. He was sent of Fort Lafayette and afterward to Fort Warren. On the 10th of day of February, 1862, Pressey was released from confinement on taking the oath of allegiance with stipulations against future misconduct and to report to the Department of State.

John Bateman was arrested at Portland by the U. S. marshal for Maine on or about the 21st of September 1861, charged with conveying dispatches for the rebels and with affording them aid and comfort. He was sent to Fort Lafayette. The papers found upon bateman were represented by the marshal as of importance, but there is no evidence in the Department of State to show what their character was. On the 2nd day of October, 1861, Bateman was released from confinement by order of the Secretary of State on taking the oath of allegiance with stipulations against future misconduct.

H. K. Stevens, late lieutenant in the U. S. Navy, was arrested at Portsnouth, N. H., September 24, 1861, by Captain Pearosn, commanding at Kittery Navy - Yard, and committed to Fort Lafayette. Stevens tendered his resignation as a lieutenant in the U. S. Navy March 25, 1861, and by order of the President his name was stricken from the rolls of the Navy Septemebr 30, 1861. No order has been issued nor action taken by the Department of State in regard to the case of Stevens.

William E. Wright, of Marion County, Ky., was arrested by Colonel R. W. Johnson, of the Kentucky Home Guard, on or about the 24th of September, 1861, charged with having taken up arms against the Government of the United States or otherwise aiding in the rebellion against the same. After his arrest he was sent by General Anderson to Indianapolis and then by ordered of the Secretary of State to Fort Lafayette and was afterward transferred to Fort Warren. It appears by Wright's statements to some of his friends who petitioned for his discharge that he had been to Bowling green, Ky., to sell horses, which were probably for the military service of the rebels, and that he had been in the State of Tennessee trying to make some money for his family, by what kind of trafic is not stated. On the 11th day of January, 1862, Wright was released from confinement on taking the oath of allegiance with stipulations against future misconduct.

The only information received at the Department of State relative to this person [J. L. O' Neil] was contained in a telegram from a Government agent dated Philadelphia, September 25, 1861, stating that O'Neil was a Virginia and an intimate friend an companion of one Winder who had been arrested for disloylty. He was ordered by the Secretary of State to be arrestred, but there is no evidence on file in the Department of State showing that he was ever committed to prison.

The first information received at the Department of State in regard to this person [David K. Morton] was contained in a letter from Andrew.