War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0300 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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British subject. An order was issued from the Department of State dated September 14, 1861, directing Rich. H. Dana, Jr., U. S. attorney, to release La Guire on condition that the British consul undertake to see him back to Nova Scotia at Her Majesty's expense. He was released on or about September 21, 1861.

The first information concerning this man [James Chapin] received at the Department of State was contained in a telegram from John Burt, deputy U. S. marshal in New York, dated Saratoga, September 3, 1861, as follows: "I have arrested captain of the Vicksburg (Miss.) Home Guards. What shall I do with him?" He was committed to Fort Lafayette by order of the Secretary of State dated September 4, 1861. At the time of his arrest the papers and correspondence in the possession of himself and wife were seized. His letters from Vicksburg to his wife contained the following statements: "July 11, 1861. -We are making a mighty effort for our independence and believe we shall have it. " Again: "I am deeply enlisted in our success, having subsribed and given money pretty liberally for my means, and have bought Confederate bonds. " An order was issued from the Department of State dated October 15, 1861, directing Lieutenant-Colonel Burke, commanding at Fort Lafayette, to release Chapion on his taking the oath of allegiance stipulating that he will do no act hostile or injurious to the United States nor hold correspondence with residents of the insurrectionary States nor leave the State of New York during the present insurrection without the permission of the Secretary of State. He was accordingly released October 17, 1861.

This person [A. D. Wharton], late a midshipman or lieutenant in the U. S. Navy, was arrested and confined at Fort Lafayette by order of the Secretary of the Navy about September 8, 1861. No order has been issued or action taken by the Department of State in regard to the case of said Wharton.

George W. Barnard, residing at New Berne, N. C., came to New York by way of the British provinces in the schooner Susan Jane, and was returning in the same vessel when he was captured September 8, 1861, and taken to Fort Lafayette from whence he was afterward transferred to Fort Warren. The first information received at the Department of State in relation to this prisoner was through a letter from his brother, Lieutenant William C. Barnard, addressed to the Postmaster-General, dated October 31, 1861, transmitted by the Postmaster-General. The said barnard was released from confinement on taking the oath of allegiance to the United States on the 30th day of November, 1861, by order of the Secretary of State.

The only information the Department of State has concerning this man [Edward Baum] is that he was arrested at Hatteas, N. C., September 9, 1861, by order of the Secretary of the Navy, while attempting to run the blockade on a merchant vessel, and committed to Fort Warren November 1, 1861, by order of the Secretary of the Navy. Said Baum remained in custody at Fort Warren February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department. (Released May 7, 1862, by order of commissioners, General Dix and Edwards Pierrepont.)