War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0299 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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Benjmanin F. McCawley was arrested about September 1, 1861, near North Point, Md., by order of General Dix and committed to Fort McHenry. He was on his way in company with twenty-three others to a sloop which was to convey them to the lower part of Maryland with a view as was supposed of joining the rebel army. McCawley was afterward by order of General Scott sent to Fort Columbus, where he arrived September 13, 1861. He was released October 5, 1861, by order of the Secretary of State on taking the oath of allegiance and stipulating not to visit or correspond with persons residing in the insurrectionary States and to do no act hostile against the United States.

Wiliam McKewen was arrested about September 1, 1861, near North Point, Md., by order of General Dix and committed to Fort Mchenry. He was on his way in company with twenty-three others to a sloop which was to convey them to the lower part of Maryland with a view as was supposed of joining the rebel army. McKewen was afterward by order of General Scott sent to Fort Columbus, where he arrived September 13, 1861. He was released October 5, 1861, by order of the Secretary of State on taking the oath of allegiance.

Frederick Tollenback was arrested about September 1, 1861, NEAR North Point, Md., by order of General Dix. He was in company with twenty-three others on his way to a sloop which was to convey them to the lower part of Maryland with a view as was supposed of joining the rebel army. Tollenback was afterward transferred by order of General Scott to Fort Columbus, where he arrived September 13, 1861. He was released October 5, 1861, by order of the Secretary of State on taking the oath of allegiance.

John Wilkins was arrested about September 1, 1861, near North Point, Md., by order of General Dix and committed to Fort McHenry. He was on his way in company with twenty-three others to a sloop which was to convey them to the lower part of Maryland with the view it is supposed of joining the rebel army. Wilkins was afterward by order of General Scott sent to Fort Columbus, where he arrived September 13, 1861. He was released October 5, 1861, by order of the Secretary of State on taking the oath of allegiance.

This man [George Thompson] was arrested in our near Baltimore about September 1, 1861, by order of General Dix and committed to Fort McHenry and from thence transferred successively to Fort Columbus and Fort Warren. He was charged with crrying on an illicit correspondence with the Confederate States or for having intended to go into their service. An order was issued from the Department of State dated November 23, 1861, directing Colonel Dimick, commanding at Fort Warren, to release Thompson on his taking the oath of allegiance, stipulating neither to enter nor correspond with the States in insurrection nor do any act hostile to the Government of the United States during the present insurrection. He was accordingly released November 26, 1861.

James La Guire, a British subject, was arrested at Boston about September 2, 1861, by order of E. W. Morton, assistant district attorney. He was charged with disloyalty and attempting to proceed to the insurrectionary States with a Canadian uniform, &c., in his trunk. Upon an examination before a magistrat La Guire was found to be a