War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0298 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

same regiment in which he (Hallinan) was to serve as chaplain. He further represented that he had command of any amount of money and would give Fabre should he desert $3,000 for an outift. No evidence* has been received at the Department of State showing that Hallinan was committed to prison.

This person [W. H. Ward], late a lieutenant in the U. S. Navy, was dismissed from the service on tendering his resignation in May, 1861, and on his arrivalin New York August 31, 1861, was arrested by the order of the Secretary of the Navy and committed to Fort Lafayette. No order has been issued or action taken by the Department of State in regard to the case ofperson [Daniel Deckart] was arrested by U. S. Marshal Lamon, of the District of Columbia, in September, 1861, and committed to the Thirteenth Street Prison in Washington. He was the publisher of the paper in Hagerstown, Md., called The Hagerstown Mail, and it is presumed that he made it a disloyal sheet, through there are no charged on file in the Department of State against him. Having made application for his release and expressed a willingness to take the oath of allegiance an order was issued from the Department of State directing General Porter, provost-marshal of Washington, to release Deckart on his taking the oath of allegiance and stipulating not to enter or correspond with any of the insurrectionary States. He was accordingly released October 9, 1861.

This person [George A. Sheahan] was arrested by order of General Daniel E. Sickles in September, 1861, in Anne Arundel County, Md., at the house of one Marriott and taken to Washington, D. C., and delivered into the custody of the commanding general at headquarters. He was charged with having in his possession letters addressed to persons in the enemy's service in Virginia with the intention of transmitting them to that State. The report of his arrest and papers found upon Sheahan are said to be filed and in possession of the military authorities. There is no evidence showing that any action was taken by the Department of State in this case or what disposition the militiary authorities made of the prisoner.

Samuel Davidson was arrested on or about September 1, 1861, near North Point, Md., by order of General Dix. He was in company with some twenty-three others on his way to a sloop which was supposed of joining the rebel army. Davidson was transferred by order of General Scott to Fort Columbus, where he arrived September 5, 1861. He was released by order of the Secretary of State October 5, 1861, on taking the oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States.

George Gosswell was arrested about September 1, 1861, near North Point, Md., by order of General Dix. He was in company with twenty-three others on his way to a sloop which was to convey them to the lower part of Maryland with a view as was supposed of joining the rebel army. Gosswell was afterward transferred by order of General Scott to Fort Columbus, where he arrived September 13, 1861. He was released October 5, 1861, by order of the Secretary of State on taking the oath of allegiance.

---------------

*See p. 57 for letter of Archbishop Hughes relating to Hallinan.

---------------