War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0297 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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was made November 6, 1861, for their release by Captain Clements, one of said officers, who stated that Robinson and Brooks were free negroes; had never been in Government employ but were mere servants for himself and other officers and were anxious to return to their families. An order was issued from the Department of State dated November 29, 1861, directing Colonel Dimick to release these men on their taking the oath of allegiance. Colonel Dimick reports December 2, 1861, that said Robinson and Brooks have no objection to the oath except that having families in North Carolina if they take the oath they cannot return to them and therefore prefer not to be dischared. A subsequent order was issued from the Department of State dated January 6, 1862, directing Colonel Dimick to release Robinson and Brooks on their parole of honor to do no act hostile to the United States during the present insurrection. They were accordingly released.

From the report of William R. Woodward, esq., prize commissioner in Washington, to the Secretary of State it appears that Thomas R. Stewart was arrested in Chesapeake Bay near Dorchester County, Md., about the 29th of August, 1861, on board the sloop T. J. Evans which was seized by the U. S. schooner Dana. He was charged with being one of the crew of the sloop which was conveying contraband arms and goods to the rebels in Virginia. Stewart was taken to Washington and placed in jail. An investigation of his case resulted in his being released by order of the Secretary of State on taking the oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States September 27, 1861.

Frank E. Williams, of the Choctaw Agency west of Arkansas, was arrested by order of John S. Keyes, U. S. marshal at Boston, August 30, 1861, and committed to Fort Lafayette by order issued from the Department of State August 30, 1861. He was charged with being disloyal and suspected of being engaged in treasonable practices. His utterance of strong ents supported the charge and suspicion. He was released September 7, 1861, by order of the Secretary of State.

Uriah B. Harrold was arrested August 30, 1861, by John A. Kennedy, esq., superintendent of police at New York City, and confined at Fort Lafayette by order of the Secretary of State. He was charged with disloyalty and with being an officer in the rebel army. The evidence upon which he was arrested consists of his own statements proved by numerous witnesses to have been reported by his family connections to the effect that he was an officer (captain) in the rebel army. An order was issued from the Department of State dated September 16, 1861, directing Lieutenant Colonel Martin Burke, commanding at Fort Lafayete, to release Harrold on his taking the oath of allegiance to the United States. He was released September 18, 1861.

M. M. Hallinan, alias Stover, was arrested August 31, 1861, by superintendent of police of New York City, John A. Kennedy, on complaint of F. A. Fabre. Hallinan, who is or was a Catholic priest, is charged by Fabre with having attempted to induce him to desert from the service of the United States (Fabre at the time being a private in Company I, Colonel Baxter's Philadelphia Fire Zouaves) and join the rebel army, offering to procure for him a commission as major in the