War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0282 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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Northampton than all other causes combined. His last act I regard as disloyal and criminal and my strong inclination was to arrest him. He has engaged in correspondence with a rebel Government at war with his own and labors to show that he has always been faithful to the former. He has lost irretreivably the respect of the friends of both. I say this in sorrow. It was in his power by a manly support of the Government to have carried the Eastern Shore of Virginia with him, and he has not only sacrificed his own influence but compromised the loyalty of both counties and possibly opened a fountain of dissension and disaster. I with you wold show him this letter for I have no concealments, and let him understand as he will from this that your letter contains no allusions to him. I write to you spontaneously what I should have said to him two weeks ago when I read his printed address to the rebel legislature of Virginia if I had not been engrossed by important business in Washington.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

U. S. MARSHAL'S OFFICE, SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK,

New York, April 7, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel MARTIN BURKE, U. S. Army,

Commandant Fort Lafayette, New York Harbor.

COLONEL: The commissioners appointed by the President to investigate the cases of state prisoners in your charge will hold their first session in this city to-morrow (Tuesday, the 8th instant) at 11 o'clock precisely, and require the presence of the under-named ten individuals* whom you will please deliver into the custody of Messrs. De Voe and Sampson, my special deputies, who will show the original requisition.

I am, colonel, your most obedient servant,

ROBT. MURRAY,

U. S. Marshal.

NEW YORK, April 8, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

We have this day examined the case sof several prisoners who have been long in prison and who are detained without just cause. Shall we order the release of such or do you want their cases with our view to be first referred to the War Department, as the prisoners are now in court? Please reply.

JOHN A. DIX.

EDWARDS PEIRREPONT.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 8, 1862.

Major General JOHN A. DIX, New York:

Release them and send their names here.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

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*Omitted.

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