War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0275 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

Search Civil War Official Records

oners at the Old Capitol Military Prison in this city, upon their engaging upon their honor that they will render no aid or comfort to the enemies in hostility to the Government of the United States.

Respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

EDWARDS PEIRRREPONT,

Commissioners.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, March 22, 1862.

Colonel W. W. LOWE, Fort Henry, Tenn.:

All citizens who come in to avoid imprisonment by the enemy should be allowed to go to Illinois or elsewhere. Prisoners of was should be retained till they are exchanged or can be sent to prison depots.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS, Baltimore, March 24, 1862.

T. F. BAYARD, Wilmington, Del.

SIR: I have been absent from this city on business connected with the military service; your letter would otherwise have been sooner answered. My direction to General Lockwood in October last was to disarm companies alleged to be disloyal if he could get any legitimate authority in Delaware, executive or military, to justify his action. The measures adopted by Colonel Wallace were approved by the major-general residing at or near Wilmignton and were therefore so far as reported to me sustained. I expect General Lockwood here shortly and will then inquire into the whole proceeding. The parties who gave bonds for the arms cannot certainly be held for the penalty as they have been dispossessed by military force.

I am, very respectfully,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

OFFICE OF THE DETROIT TRIBUNE,

Detroit, March 28, 1862.

[Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD.]

MY DEAR FRIEND: Circumstances have transpired which render it certain to my mind that there exists here and probably through every Northern State an organized treasonable association which is in sympathy and constant communication with similar associations in the rebel States and with the rebels. Since the publication of the Guy Hopkins'* letter, which you may or may not have observed in the Tribune, a certain class of men uniformly known as Democratic sympathizers with the rebels have exhibited a spirit which goes far to prove in the minds of candid men the truth of that letter. Canada seems to be the base of their operations and communication with Europe and the South through sympathizing friends along the borders of their frontier, extending from this city to Lake Huron at least if no farther.

---------------

*See case of Hopkins et al., p. 1244 et seq.

---------------