War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0177 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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men sent from here I have brought back 3,100. There are about 100 left in the two counties. As soon as convenient I trust you will appoint a collector and surveyor.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 13, 1861.

JOHN A. KENNEDY, Esq., Superintendent of Police, New York.

SIR: Your letter* of the 11th instant has been received. In reply I have no inform you that your remark on the subject of passports for passengers to California having been taken into consideration it has been determined to restore the original order upon the subject. In view, however, of the complaints which have been made upon the subject it is presumed that their order will be executed with the same discrimination which is expected in regard to passports for persons bound to Europe, and that while all cabin passengers will be required to provide themselves with passports passengers in other parts of the vessel may be exempted from the requirement except in particular cases. Conspirators against the Government should reasonably be suspected of embarking as passengers elsewhere than in the cabin.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

HEADQUARTERS, Baltimore, December 14, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 10th instant received this morning I have the honor to inclose the two letters+ which led to the detection of Isaac G. Mask. In the letter of the 17th of September signed "I. G. M. " he gives information in regard to the naval expedition sent out from New York and asks that it may be communicated "to General Beauregard or some one of the influential members of the Confederate Government without an hour's delay. " In the letter of the 18th he gives the same information and says: "It is of the utmost importance that all knowledge of the expedition and its destination should be kept from the rebel Government. " This letter professing to be loyal is signed with his name in full contains his address. Both are written in pencil. Letters in the same handwriting signed "I. G. M. " had been repeatedly intercepted. They were all written in pencil but until he had the folly to write a loyal letbeen found to the author. I remember several of these letters but as they contained no important information they were not preserved.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, December 16, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, &c.

SIR: I have this afternoon had the honor to receive two notes from you dated thirteen days ago and a third dated twelve days ago. They

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*Not found.

+Omitted.

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12 R R-SERIES II, VOL II