War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0148 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

arrested at Frederick on the 16th of that month by the soldiers of the First Regiment of the Potomac Home Brigade, under command of Lieutenant Colonel George R. Dennis, and that he was detained on the charge of being a deserter from the U. S. service. On receiving this letter I directed Her Majesty's consul at Baltimore to inquire into the matter. The consul accordingly addressed on the 22nd of last month a letter to Lieutenant-Colonel Dennis of which I have the honor to inclose a copy. * No answer having been returned to it I am under the necessity of requesting your assistance in investigating the case.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, our most obedient humble servant,

LYONS.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 25, 1861.

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN,

Headquarters U. S. Army, &c.

GENERAL: Representations have been made to this Department that persons in local authority in the city of Boston obtain access to Fort Warren to the detriment of the public interests and to the annoyance of the U. S. officers in charge. I will therefore thanks you to transmit an order to Colonel Justin Dimick, the officer in command of the fort, to the effect that no persons except U. S. military officers and U. S. district attorneys, U. S. marshals and deputies, and the U. S. dispatch agent at Boston shall hereafter be permitted to visit any of the prisoners confined at the forts in Boston Harbor without a written permission from this Department.

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 25, 1861.

Colonel JUSTIN DIMICK, Fort Warren, Boston.

SIR: You will please permit Jonathan Amory, esq., to visit any of the prisoner confined under your charge at any time he may deem it advisable to do so.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, November 25, 1861.

Messrs. JOHN MONROE & CO., New York.

GENTLEMAN: I have received your letter+ of the 23rd instant. You have doubtless already been informed by John A. Kennedy, esq. (in accordance with instructions given to him), of the circumstances which placed your firm suspicion, and I doubt not, since you have unknown to yourselves been made the medium of transmitting treasonable correspondence between the insurgents and their agents in Europe, you will cheerfully avail yourselves of the caution thus given against the practice of forwarding letters which by the proclamation of the President have been prohibited from the U. S. mails.

I am, gentleman, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.