War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0142 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

BOSTON, November 18, 1861.

SECRETARY OF STATE:

An order has come to put certain political prisoners in Fort Independence. That fort is not in condition to receive them. Fort Warren has some prisoners and is in proper condition. Is not Independence a mistake for Warren?

BENJ. F. BUTLER.

HEADQUARTERS, Baltimore, November 18, 1861.

Brigadier General H. H. LOCKWOOD,

Commanding Expedition to Eastern Shore.

GENERAL: Lieutenant Dix arrived this morning with your dispatch* communicating the gratifying intelligence that the rebel organizations in your neighborhood had dissolved. * * * Please bear in mind the ulterior object of the expedition - to bring these counties by their own voluntary action back into the Union - and with this view see their leading men as you advance. * * * Dispose of the state prisoners of whom you write to me as you think proper.

I am, general, respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

U. S. MARSHAL'S OFFICE, DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS,

Boston, November 19, 1861.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: I have the honor to report that * * * Lieutenant-Colonel McPherson is about to leave for the West where he is ordered to report to General Halleck, and his absence will leave the post [Independence] without an officer. * * * I have communicated to Colonel Dimick, commanding at Fort Warren, your letter of the 13th instant relating to the transfer of the political prisoners to Fort Independence and am engaged with him in making the necessary arrangements. The absence of Colonel McPherson from this post will require the detail by the proper department of some officer to take command there and perhaps of an addition to the garrison, If Colonel Dimick remains at Fort Warren I take the liberty to suggest that his lieutenant (Buell) who has had the immediate charge of the prisoners and knows them all by sight would I should judge be a very suitable officer for the post if the trust can be confined to a lieutenant.

There are now about 115 political prisoners in Fort Warren, and this number can I think be conveniently accommodated in Fort Independence. To-morrow I am to visit band examine it with Colonel Dimick and after that will make the transfer as soon as it can be made ready for the purpose and Colonel Dimick receives his orders. In the meantime and until it is done when I will report at once to you I think al political prisoners might as well be sent to Fort Warren as before, and I have the honor to be,

Your obedient servant,

JOHN S. KEYES,

U. S. Marshal.

---------------

* Not found.

---------------