War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0091 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

Search Civil War Official Records

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

Washington City, October 7, 1861.

SECRETARY OF STATE.

SIR: I was informed by the President of the United States some days since that he had referred to you the application of Mr. Isaac Miller, an employe of the Government at the arsenal in this city, against whom charges of disloyalty had been preferred and evidence taken before them committee, for restoration of his former place from which he had been removed on the report to the evidence in his case to the Secretary of War, with a request that he should be reinstated in on hearing his statement you should be satisfied that he was loyal.

The evidence before the committee disclose the facts that Mr. Miller had for more than forty years been the recipient of the bounty of the Government; that his wife and daughter now living in this city are open and bold in their declarations of hostility to the Government, and that Miller himself expressed his gratification at the attack made upon the Massachusetts troops in Baltimore. I desire to be informed if any part of this testimony was transmitted to you the President, or was before you when you examined the matter; and also if Mr. Miller has been restored to his former position by virtue of the instructions sent you by the President?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO F. POTTER,

Chairman of Committee of Investigation.

NEW YORK, October 7, 1861.

Honorable S. CAMERON:

One hundred and thirty-four prisoners in Fort Lafayette. All full.

MARTIN BURKE,

Lieutenant-Colonel, U. S. Army.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND, Numbers 5. Louisville, Ky., October 7, 1861.

The commanding general learns with deep regret that arrest are being made in some parts of the State upon the slightest and most trivial grounds. He desires the civil authorities and orders the military not to make any arrests except where the parties are attempting to join the rebels or are engaged in giving aid or information to them, and in all cases the evidence must be such as will convict them before a court of justice. In some cases it is understood that the home guards have gone into adjoining counties and arrested and carried off parties who have been quietly remaining at home the expectation that they would not be interfered with, provided that they did nothing in violation of the spirit of the proclamation bearing date of September 24, issued these headquarters. Some instances are mentioned of persons having been arrested and taken out of the State.

This is all contrary to what the commanding general has declared to be his wish, and he trust it will not be repeated.

It is believed that many of those who at one time sympathized with rebellion are desirous of returning to their allegiance and wish to