War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0011 SUSPECTED AND DISLOYAL PERSONS.

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Third. Baltimore would afford most excellent camps of instruction for raw troops. They can be easily and cheaply supported here in healthy and convenient locations, well drilled and disciplined, and their presence would afford support to the Government against the rebel elements in the city. In a short time you could safely withdraw the best troops for service elsewhere leaving the new levies in possession here.

With respect I submit these considerations to you, and remain, your obliged and obedient servant,

N. P. BANKS,

General, Commanding.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Wheeling, Va., June 21, 1861.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

SIR: Reliable information has been received at this department from various parts of this State that large numbers of evil-minded persons have banded together in military organizations with intent to overthrow the government of the State, and for that purpose have called to their aid like-minded persons from other States who in pursuance of such call have invaded this Commonwealth. They are now making war on the loyal people of the State. They are pressing citizens against their consent into their military organizations and seizing and appropriating their property to aid in the rebellion.

I have not at my command sufficient military force to suppress this rebellion and violence. The legislature cannot be convened in time to act in the premises. It therefore becomes my duty as governor of this Commonwealth to call on the Government of the United States for aid to suppress such rebellion and violence. I therefore earnestly request that you will furnish a military force to aid in suppressing the rebellion and to protect the good people of this Commonwealth from domestic violence.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

FRANCIS H. PEIRPOINT,

Governor.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTHEAST VIRGINIA,

Arlington, June 21, 1861.

Colonel HEINTZELMAN, Commanding Brigade:

Through the intercession of Mr. Seward, Secretary of State, I am induced to order that George W. Armes, now a prisoner under your guards, be returned to his position in the State Department on his own recognizance.

I. McDOWELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

ALEXANDRIA, VA., June 25, 1861.

Captain J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Arlington.

DEAR SIR: On the 15th instant I left with you at Arlington a letter from Major J. F. Lee introducing me to General McDowell, and a letter from me to General McDowell in which I asked him to inform me whether