War of the Rebellion: Serial 115 Page 0006 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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few years, and that the new taxes are as much as the people ought to be expected to carry.

Until the Mississippi debt is settled the credit of the South is just nothing at all.

I remain, yours, very truly,

EDWARD HASLENWOOD.

[Inclosure Numbers 4.]

7 LOTHBURY, EAST CHELSEA, LONDON, April 27, 1861.

JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Southern Confederacy, Montgomery, Ala.

SIR: It may so happen after all that the Southern Confederacy may again pass into and become part of the United States of America, and if so the opportunity ought not to be lost for merging the debts of the individual States into oen common homogeneous debt, including Mississippi, and also insisting on a great reduction of the tariff. Apparently the credit of the United States is at a low ebb, but let the whole be once more united and I have no hesitation in stating that a loan could be raised bearing 4 per cent. interest large enough to absorb the whole of the States' debts (including Mississippi), and that the price of that stock would soon be higher than any of the Southern 6 per cents or Northern 5 per cents of the separate States. Another point of great importance would be to stipulate that the number of States in the Senate should be equal for the South as for the North. To effect this there must be ultimately an extension by purchase or conquest of Mexico, and nothing would give greater satisfaction in Europe than to see the whole of that country absorbed into the States, provided that the debt of Mexico was acknowledged and guarantied. The peon law of Mexico is not far removed from the slavery of the South.

I remain, your most obedient servant,

EDWARD HASLENWOOD.

OFFICE U. S. DISTRICT ATTORNEY FOR

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW YORK,

New York, May 20, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

SIR: In pursuance of the instructions of Colonel James Cameron, your accredited agent, I made arrangements with the marshal and with our general superintendent of police which resulted in the simultaneous possession by the Government to-day, May 20, at 3 o'clock p. m., of all telegraphic dispatches sent to or received from the Southern section of the country for a year and upward. They are so numerous and bulky and so systematically arrange that the marshal determined not to remove them at present and to place two deputy marshals in continual charge of the apartments in which the dispatches were found and are stored with instructions to permit no person to have access to them.

We await a consultation among ourselves and perhaps instructions from you before taking a further step in the matter.

The companies mildly protested in order to place themselves right before their customers, but they and their counsel made no serious objection to the proceeding and now appear willing to afford every facility in their power to aid the object of the Government.

I inclose a copy of my letter to the marshal upon which he has acted.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. DELAFIELD SMITH,

U. S. District Attorney.