War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0928 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

Search Civil War Official Records

There is no call for this double guard around me. It is done to oppress me and my family. My wife and children are treated as prisoners; and all marketing is excluded from the house by a military order not to allow any persons to my door or yard. I hope for the honor of the Southern character that no other private family within the eleven seceded States is subjected to such an ordeal. Certain I am that such tyranny and oppression, such outrages and insults, will never diminish my esteem for the old United States Government or increase my respect for the Southern Confederacy. Feeble as I am ready and anxious to go beyond your lines as it will relieve my family of this oppression. If I cannot be removed in accordance with the pledge of your War Department I am willing may desirous to go back to jail if that will secure the repose of an afflicted, insulted and outraged family.

I am, very truly, &c.,

W. G. BROWNLOW.

KNOXVILLE, February 27, 1862.

Honorable J. P. BENJAMIN:

Satisfied upon reliable information that my personal safety forbids my going out of this Confederacy by way or Richmond I ask the justice to allow Major Monsarrat to send me through the lines either over Cumberland Mountains or via Nashville. I prefer the latter as I am not yet well enough to undergo the fatigues of traveling on horseback.

Very respectfully, &c.,

W. G. BROWNLOW.

RICHMOND, VA., March 1, 1862.

Major MONSARRAT, Knoxville:

You are authorized to send Brownlow out of Tennessee by the Cumberland Mountains or any safe road.

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS,

Knoxville, March 3, 1862.

Honorable J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

SIR: Your telegraphic order [of 1st instant] to transmit Doctor Brownlow out of Tennessee by "Cumberland Mountains or any safe road" was received on Saturday. This morning I sent Doctor Brownlow in charge of Colonel [H. Casey] Young of General Carroll's staff with a guard of ten men to Nashville and thence to Kentucky. I did not deem it safe to send by any of the mountain passes.

With great respect, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

G. H. MONSARRAT,

Captain, Commanding Post.