War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0919 UNION REBELLION IN EAST TENNESSEE.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Knoxville, December 29, 1861.

J. C. RAMSEY, C. S. District Attorney.

SIR: In answer to your note of the 28th I state that though not aware of Doctor Brownlow's place of concealment his letter dated November 22 (inclosed a copy and my reply*) induced me to believe that he was not very distant from this city and could have been arrested. You will also see by his letter that he seemed only to dread violence but was entirely willing to be tried before the civil tribunals for any offense of which he might be charged.

Respectfully,

WM. H. CARROLL,

Bridagier-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Knoxville, December 29, 1861.

Honorable J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

SIR: In accordance with your letter of instructions Mr. Ramsey, the district attorney, entered a nolle prosequi in Brownolw's case. As commander of this post in order that your future instructions might be complied with I caused Brownlow to be remanded to prison. This measure was necessary even for his own safety and in order that the public peace might not be violated. I inter from your letter to the distict attorney that Brownlow is entitled to a safe-concudt beyond our lines and with reference to this I await your further instructions.

I have just been appointed commandant of this post and have already discovered numberless abuses that should be corrected. Marauding bands of armed men go through the country representing themselves to be the authorized agents of the State or Confederate Government; they impress into service horses and men; they plunder the helpless and especially the quondam supporters of Johnson, Maynard and Brownlow; they force men to enlist by the representation that otherwise they will be incarcerated at Tuscaloosa; they force the people to feed and care for themselves and horses without compensation. I would gladly have instructions as to the mode of correcting these abuses and the character of punishment to be inflicted upon those guilty of such offenses.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. H. MONSARRAT,

Captain, Artillery, Commanding Post.

[Without date. Entered "Received January 2,, 1862".]

Honorable JEFFERSON DAVIS,

President of the Confederate States of America:

The undersigned begs to lay before your excellency the following statement and accompanying documents:

He had for reasons that need not here be stated opposed the secession of Tennessee and was while the question was pending and undecided before the people of the State a zealous advocate of the Union; but after the ordinance of secession had been confirmed by the vote

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* See Brownlow to Carroll and Carroll's answer, pp. 902 and 903.

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