War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0895 UNION REBELLION IN EAST TENNESSEE.

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NOVEMBER 27, 1861.

Brigadier General D. C. BUELL.

GENERAL: What is the reason for concentration of troops at Louisville? I urge movement at once on Eastern Tennessee unless it is impossible. No letter from you for severad days. Reply. I still trust to your judgment though urging my own views.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, Monday night [November 29, 1861].

Brigadier General D. C. BUELL, Louisville.

MY DEAR BUELL: * * * Keep up the hearts of the Tennesseeans. Make them feel that far from any intention of deserting them all will be done to sustain them. Be sure to maintain their ardor for it will avail you much in the future. I am not as a general rule at all disposed to scatter troops. I believe in attacks by concentrated masses but it seems to me with the little local knowledge I possess that you might attempt two movements-one on Eastern Tennessee say with 15,000 men, and a strong attack on Nashville as you propose with say 50,000 men.

I think we owe it to our Union friends in Eastern Tennessee to protect them at all hazards. First secure that; then if you possess the means carry Nashville.

* * * * * * *

In haste, truly, yours,

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, December 3, 1861.

Brigadier General D. C. BUELL, Louisville.

MY DEAR BUELL: I inclose two letters which were referred to me by the President and were intended for your eye. I do so feeling sure that you sumpathize with me in my intense regard for the noble Union men of Eastern Tennessee; that you will overlook all mere matters of form; and that you will devote all your energies toward the salvation of men so eminently deserving our protection. I understand your movements and fully concur in their propriety but I must still urge the occupation of Eastern Tennessee as a duty we owe to our gallant friends there who have not hesitated to espuse our cause.

Please send than with the least possible delay troops enough to protect these men. I still feel sure that the best strategical move in this case will be that dictated by the simple feelings of humanity. We must preserve these noble fellows from hars; everything urges us to do that-faith, interest and loyalty. For the sake of these Eastern Tennesseeans who have taken part with us I would gladly sacrifice mere military advantages; they deserve our protection and at all hazards they must have it. I know that your nature is noble enough to forget any slurs they may cast upon you. Protect the true men and you have everything to look forward to. In no event allow them to be crushed out. * * * You may fully rely on my full support in the movement I have so much at heart-the liberation of Eastern Tennessee.