War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0808 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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INDIANAPOLIS, February 25, 1862.

Major- General HALLECK:

Among the prisoners here are fifteen or twenty negroes who are claimed by officers as slaves and servants. What shall be done with them!

O. P. MORTON,

Governor of Indiana.

HEADQUARTERS DEAPRTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, February 25, 1862.

Governor MORTON, Indianapolis:

Let the negroes go if they wish it; if they prefer to stary they must be under military police and not allowed to go out and inthecamp or barracks.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

GENEAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. D IST OF WEST TENNESSEE, Numbers 14.

Fort Donelson, February 26, 1862.

General Orders, Numbers 3, of the series of 1861, from headquarters Department of the Missouir, are still inf orce and msut be observed.

The number of citizens who are applying for permission to pass through the camps to look for their fugitive slaves proves the necessity of the order and its faithful obervance. Such permits cannot be granted; therfore the great necessity of keeping out fugitives. Such slaves as were within the lines at the time fot he capture of Fort Donelson and such as have been used by the enemy in bukilding the fotificatins or in any way hostile to the Govenrment will not be released or permitted to return to their masters but will be employed in the quartemaster's department for the benefit of Government.

All officers and companies now keeping slaves so captured will immediately report them to the district quartemaster. Regimental commanders will be held accountable for all violatins of this order within their respective commands.

By order of Brigadier General U. S. Grant, commanding:

JNO A. RAWLINS,

Assistatn Adjutant- General.

OFFICE OF PROVOST- MARSHAL- GENERAL,

DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOUIR,

Saint Louis, March 3, 1862.

THe POLICE COMMISSINERS,

Saint Louis, Mo.

GENTLEMEN: The city policement are in the habit of arresting negroes as runaways, and frequently arrest or attempt to arrest the servants of the army officers who are put to the trouble of obtaining ordrs to prevent their servants from being taken from the mont he very eve of theiir leaving the city. This is exceedingly annooying to officerfs under marching orders. They do not desire to be considered as resisting any civil process. It is not their intention nor the intention of the military authorities to interfere with or prevent the owner of a slave from pursuing his legal remedies to recover his slave. But