War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0772 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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I said in the Senate of the United State and my experience since only demonstrates its truth that in my opinion the institution would perish with the march of the Federal armies.

Again I say that the mass of the personal property in Missouri including slave is at this moment held by the wives and children assisted by the Federal Army while the husband and father are actually in arms against the Government. In my opinion our policy in this regard should be changed.

Confiscation of slaves and other property which can be made useful to the army should follow treason as the thunder peal follows the lightning flash. Until this change is made you offer premiums for the men to remain away in the army of the enemy. I had a man cowardly shot in the woods to-day within sight of our camp by the very men I have no doubt whose property you are so anxious to protect.

I am endeavoring to find what transportation I have to spare if any and will report to you accordingly.

Yours,

J. H. LANE,

Commanding Kansas Brigade.

HDQRS. SECOND Brigadier, SECOND DIV., ARMY OF THE WEST,

Boonville, Mo., October 6, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Headquarters Army of the West, Jefferson City.

SIR: I send by the Northerner in charge of Captain Renfro, Ninth Regiment Missouri Volunteers, several slaves who having given important information to Major Eppstein while in command of this post which saved his command from surprise now seek protection from their masters who threaten to kill them. Major Eppstein cannot longer protect them. I therefore send them to Jefferson City where they can work on the fortifications.

Very respectfully,

JNO C. KELTON,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Fort McHenry, October 12, 1861.

S. R. RICHARDSON, Esq.

SIR: When I took command of this department being anxious to avoid all difficulty in regard to salves I directed that no negroes should be permitted to enter our encampments except as laborers or servants and then only with the consent of their masters if they were not free. It was in obeying this order that Colonel Morse directed your boy who had found his way into the naval shool to be sent out of it. I am satisfied the colonel had no other desire but to avoid the very difficulty that has now occurred. The error was originally in permittig the boy to enter the lines at all and this it seems had been done by the soldiers befor ethe colonel was aware of it. I have given directions to Colonel Morse as you request to ascertain if possible by the most searching examination whether his officers or soldiers are harboring the boy or have aided in his concealment or escape. I am very desirous to aovid all cause of complaint on the part of the citizens of Maryland in regard to any interference with their rights of property especially in slaves