War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0763 CAPTURED AND FUGITIVE SLAVES.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Fort McHenry, Md., August 8, 1861.

Honorable S. CAMERON, Secretary of War.

SIR: The inclosed letter* which I desire to submit for the early attention of the Government explains itself. Three negroes-acknowledging that their master lives on the shores of the Chesapeake in Virginia below the mouth of the Potomac, and is an active secessionist-were taken from a canoe at the mouth of the Severn on their way as they said to Baltimore. I take it for granted they are fugitives; but I suppose the matter should be treated precisely as it would be if we were in the occupation of Virginia. We would not meddle with the slaves even of secessionists. My letter to Colonel Roberts takes the ground that we have nothing to do with slaves; that we are neither negro-stealers nor negro-catchers, and that we should send them away if they came to us. The matter is one of some delicacy and I prefer not to send m letter if it conflicts with the views of the Government.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Fort McHenry, Md., August 9, 1861.

Colonel JOSEPH C. PINCKNEY,

Sixth Regiment New York State Militia.

COLONEL: A colored man by the name of Nicholas Johnson, commonly called Nick, was in the hospital at Annapolis while you were in command and disappeared as you are aware just before your regiment returned to New York. I know through Governor Hicks that the circumstances are all familiar to you. I need not therefore enter into any statement of them. But I write by the direction of the War Department to request "your exertions toward the recovery of the boy" and that you "take such measures as may be in your power toward the accomplishment of this purpose. "

I am, respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Bethel, August 9, 1861.

Colonel GEORGE DEAS,

Adjutant-General, C. S. Army.

SIR: As soon as I learned the result of the battle of Manassas I ordered about 2,000 men under Colonel Johnston, of the cavalry, to proceed to the immediate vicinity of Hampton and Newport News to make reconnaissance of those places and to be guided by the reuslts. I directed him also to scour the country up to the enemy's pickets and to capture and send up to the works at Williamsburg all the negroes to be found below a certain line. These duties were well performed by Colonel Johnston and some 150 negroes were captured and delivered at Williamsburg.

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