War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0713 THE MARYLAND ARRESTS.

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have taken some pains to obtain the opinions of our leading Union men and learn that they coincide in the belief that the time has not yet arrived to release these prisoners and that instead of relaxing the Government should be more stringent than ever. You have doubtless observed the animus that still impels the traitors among us. The persecution threatened to the committee who visited Washington recently in relation to obtaining employment for our working people; the defiance still apparent of certain ministers of the gospel in refusing to officiate on fast or Thanksgiving days when proclaimed by the President of the United States or governor of Maryland; the recent charge given to the grand jury of Talbot County by Judge Carmichael; the indictment (for treason against the State) against the Senator, Goldsborough, consequent upon that charge-are sufficient to show that the snake is only scotched and not killed, and I think show conclusively that leniency exhibited now by the Government might be attended with very serious results.

I would respectfully refer you to the journal of proceedings of the senate and house of delegates during the sessions held at Annapolis and Frederick, from which you will learn the degree of turpitude by which the members were actuated.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

GEO. R. DODGE,

Provost-Marshal.

[Sub-inclosure.]

1. P. F. Rasin, house of delegates; voted treasonably; not otherwise objectionable.

2. Jas. W. Maxwell, house of delegates; voted treasonably; spoke inimically to the Government; think him a dangerous man; always misrepresented his constituents on this question.

3. Clarke J. Duran, house of delegates; voted treasonably; of but little influence.

4. J. H. Gordon, house of delegates; voted treasonably; a dangerous man.

5. R. M. Denison, house of delegates; voted treasonably; a dangerous man.

6. E. G. Kilbourn, house of delegates; was speaker and exercised much influence; was very violent; is a Northern man by birth; we think him a dangerous man and should be retained.

7. A. Kessler, house of delegates; voted wrong; do not think him very obnoxious.

8. Thos. J. Claggett, house of delegates; voted wrong; not otherwise obnoxious; has but little influence.

9. Wm. E. Salmon, house of delegates; in same position as Claggett.

10. B. Mills, house of delegates; in same position as Claggett.

11. J. L. Jones, house of delegates; same position as Claggett.

12. Lawrence Sangston, house of delegates; voted wrong but has but little influence; an old hunker politican; it is his trade; has belonged to any party that would pay him for a number of years past.

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15. J. M. Brewer we have no knowledge of.

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19. Wm. R. Miller we have no knowledge of.