War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0668 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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Doctor Lynch, a member of the State Senate of Maryland, was arrested September 26, 1861, by the military authorities of the United States and committed to Fort Lafayette from whence he was afterward transferred to Fort Warren. This arrest was made as a measure of military precaution to guard against the treasonable purposes of the conspirators who sought to overthrow the power of the National Government in Maryland and to plunge that State into civil war. Application having been made for the release of Doctor Lynch an other was issued from the Department of State January 20, 1862, directing Colonel Dimick, commanding at Fort Warren, to discharge him on his taking the oath of allegiance and stipulating that he will not enter the insurrestionary States nor hold correspondence with residents thereof nor do any act hostile to the United States. He was accordingly released January 24, 1862.

Dr. Charles Macgill of Hagerstown, Md., a member of the senate of that State, was arrested on or about the 30th day of September, 1861, by Major-General Banks by direction of the Secretary of State and taken to fort McHenry from whence he was afterward transferred to Fort Lafayette and still later to Fort Warren. Macgill was charged on oath with disloyal sentiments and purposes and with having declared his intention to give aid to the rebel cause to the extent of contributing every dollar he could spare to the support of the war and that he was going to see if he could not make arrangements in Virginia to fill Pennsylvania with troops. On the 9th of October, 1861, Doctor Macgill was offered his release on condition of takin the oath of allegiance with proper stipulations of security which he refused to do. The said Macgill remained in custody at Fort Warren February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the other of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

William E. Salmon was arrested by order of the military authorities at Frederick, Md., September 17, 1861, and committed to Fort Lafayette and from thence transferred to Fort Warren by order of the Secretary of State. He was charged with being a disloyal member of the Maryland Legislature. An order was issued from the Department of State dated December 23, 1861, directing Dimick, commanding at Fort Warren, to release Salmon on his taking the oath of allegiance stipulating that he will do no act hostile to the Government of the United States during the present insurrestion, &c. He was accordingly released December 27, 1861.

Clarke J. Durant, of Saint Mary's County, Md., a member of the Legislature from that county, was arrested at Frederick on the 17th of September, 1861, by Major-General Banks acting under the order of the War Department. He was taken to Annapolis and thence by sea to Fort Lafayette and subsequently transferred to Fort Warren. Durant was one of the band of disloyal mambers of the Legislature of Maryland who were known to be conspiring to pass an act of secession. His arrest was a measure of military precaution for the preservation of the public peace and to prevent the consummation of that treasonable design. On the 16th of December, 1861, an order was issued to release Durant from confinement on his taking the oath of allegiance which