War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0657 THE MARYLAND ARRESTS.

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in Baltimore my detention is simply a matter of precaution the object of the Government will have been as well attained as by my confinement which is destroying my health. I am now under treatment of the garrison surgeon for an affection of the heart which I attribute to the nature of my confinement at Lafayette.

I am, respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

GEORGE P. KANE.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 29, 1861.

Lieutenant Colonel MARTIN BURKE, Fort Hamilton, N. Y.

COLONEL: Although no objection was made to the sending by the marshal of New York to the Baltimore commissioners at Fort Lafayette of a subpoena to appear as witnesses in a case to be tried in Baltimore it was not contemplated to allow the commissioners to be released for that purpose.

I am your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Baltimore, Md., November 1, 1861.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 29th ultimo* inclosing one from George P. Kane which is herewith returned. If Mr. Kane is permitted to visit the city of New York for the purpose of attending to his private business on his parole of honor to surrender himself at a given time and place or whenever and wherever required and in the meantime to have no correspondence and hold no communication with others on political subjects I have no doubt that his engagement will be faithfully kept and that the indulgence may be safely extended to him.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

BOSTON, November 16, 1861.

SETH C. HAWLEY.

MY DEAR SIR: I shall feel obliged if you will read the inclosed copies of letters in regard to Mayor Brown's conduct on 19th April. Many more could be added and the petitions of the best and most loyal men in Massachusetts can be obtained in favor of Mr. Brown. I cannot but think it for the public welfare that every leniency should be shown him that is compatible with the safety of Baltimore. I can add my testimony to the inclosed that in private communications with Mr. Brown I was entirely satisfied of his good faith in regard to the President's expected passage through Baltimore; that he was at that time utterly opposed to the doctrine of secession and that his opinions regarding

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* See p. 656.

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42 R R-SER II, VOL I.