War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0652 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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In regard to Mayor Brown's resignation the election of to-day will decide whether it will be of any consequence. The presiding officer of the first branch of common council officiates during the absence of the mayor from the city. We elect the members to-day and are confident of a triumphant result.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 11, 1861.

Major General JOHN A. DIX, Fort McHenry, Baltimore.

GENERAL: If you approve Mr. Brown may be released on taking the oath and giving his parole not to do any actor hold any correspondence treasonable or injurious to the Union, and not to enter the State of Maryland or insurrectionary State during the insurrection. These restrains to be removed only by direction of the Secretary of State.

I am, general, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

HEADQUARTERS,

Fort Columbus, N. Y., October 12, 1861.

Honorable F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I received yesterday from the [U. S.] marshal Kane, the ex-police marshal of Baltimore. I have allowed Marshal Kane to quarter with the prisoners of war captured at Hatteras Inlet he giving his parole the same as the war prisoners.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. LOOMIS,

Colonel Fifth Infantry, Commanding.

FORT WARREN, BOSTON HARBOR, October 22, 1862.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

I am requested to visit Boston to see a dear friend in Boston who is not expected to live many hours. Will you telegraph Colonel Dimick to permit me to go if satisfied of the facts. Please reply by telegraph at once.

GEO. P. KANE,

Prisoner.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 23, 1861.

ROBERT MURRAY, Esq., U. S. Marshal, New York.

SIR: Complaints still some that the comforts which might be allowed the prisoners at Fort Lafayette are not enjoyed by them. Although these complaints have their origin in reports which arose before you went there to look after the comfort of the prisoners you will proceed again to the fort and remedy what admits of remedy.