War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0631 THE MARYLAND ARRESTS.

Search Civil War Official Records

[Inclosure.]

Statement of Richard Norris, Jr., esq.

TO THE BOARD OF POLICE:

In reply to your inquiry I beg leave to state that on Friday, the 19th of April, I accompanied Colonel Kane in a carriage to the President street depot. When we arrived there as well as I recollect there were about fourteen cars filled with troops intended to be passed through Baltimore. They were mostly unarmed and were being attacked by large numbers of the people congregated there. Marshal Kane made every possible effort to protect the troops; caught hold of many of the assailants, drove them back and prevented them from continuing their attacks; addressed others declaring they were bringing disgrace n the city by assailing unarmed men. His whole conduct was perfectly fearless.

It is my sincere belief that but for the manly and energetic course pursued by him many lives would have been lost at the President street station. Words cannot convey my impression of the bravery he exhibited on that occasion or of the security he afforded to the troops. When I arrived at the depot I feared there would be a great loss of life but so far as I have heard all escaped in safety.

R. NORRIS, JR.

Resolution adopted by the House of Representatives July 24, 1861.

Resolved, That the President be requested immediately to communicate to this House if in his judgment not incompatible with the public interest the grounds, reason and evidence upon which the police commissioners of Baltimore were arrested and are now detained as prisoners at Fort McHenry.

WASHINGTON, July 27, 1861.

TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:

In answer to the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 24th instant asking grounds, reason and evidence upon which the police commissioners of Baltimore were arrested and are now detained as prisoners at Fort McHenry I have to state that it is judged to be incompatible with the public interest at this time to furnish the information called for by the resolution.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

[JULY 29, 1861. --For a report of the police board to the General Assembly of Maryland inclosing their memorial to the Congress of the United States, and for the memorial of the mayor and city council of Baltimore to Congress, see Series I, Vol. II, pp. 144-156.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF MARYLAND,

Fort McHenry, July 29, 1861.

Major JACOB B. HARDENBERGH,

Twentieth Regiment New York State Militia.

MAJOR: You will receive on board the steamer Whitney the following persons, arrested by my predecessor in command of this department and charged with offenses against the Government and laws of