War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0620 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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George P. Kane, marshal of police of Baltimore, was arrested on the 27th of June, 1861, by Major-General Banks and confined at Fort McHenry from whence he was transferred to Fort Lafayette and afterward to Fort Columbus and Fort Warren. Kane was notoriously in deep sympathy with the rebels and his arrest was a measure of military precaution. No testimony has been furnished to the State Department by the military department at Baltimore of any specific acts of disloyalty by Kane. November 27, 1861, Kane being then confined at Fort Warren was released for three weeks on his parole to attend the funeral of his father-in-law at the expiration of which time he returned to Fort Warren where he remained in custody February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

Charles Howard was one of the Baltimore police commissioners, notoriously disloyal and in deep collusion with the rebels, having several sons in their military service with his avowed approbation. In a letter dated November 14, 1861, he states that he was arrested on the morning of the 1st of July, 1861, by an order of Major-General Banks acting as he stated under instructions from the War Department. He was confined at Fort McHenry but afterward transferred to Fort Lafayette and thence under instructions from the War Department. He was confined at Fort McHenry but afterward transferred to Fort Lafayette and thence to Fort Warren. On the 14th of November, 1861, he was asked by direction of the Secretary of State if he would be willing to take the oath of allegiance to the Constitution and Government of the United States if he should be set at liberty. He replied formally in writing that he would not. So far as the Department of State is advised the arrest and detention of the Charles Howard seem to have been military precautionary measures founded upon his well-known sympathies with treason. The said Howard remained in custody at Fort Warren February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

William H. Gatchell was one of the board of commissioners of police of Baltimore, universally known and admitted to be disloyal and in deep sympathy with the rebellion. He was arrested on the 1st of July, 1861, by order of Major-General Banks and confined at Fort McHenry from whence he was transferred to Fort Lafayette and subsequently to Fort Warren. This arrest was made as a measure of military precaution to guard against the abuse of authority in furtherance of the interests of the insurrection to which the police commissioners were contributing all their exertions. The said Gatchell remained in custody at Fort Warren February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.

John W. Davis was one of the police commissioners of Baltimore, notoriously disloyal and in deep collusion with the rebellion. He was arrested on the 1st day of July, 1861, by order of Major-General Banks and confined in Fort McHenry until removed to Fort Lafayette whence he was afterward transferred to Fort Warren. When asked in November, 1861, by direction of the Secretary of State if he would be willing to take the oath of allegiance to the Constitution and Government of the United States if he should be set at liberty he evaded an