War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0603 THE MARYLAND ARRESTS.

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they should be sent away from Fort McHenry to some place of security more distant from their friends who are constantly seeking access to them.

I am, very respectfully,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

U. S. CONSULATE-GENERAL,

BRITISH NORTH AMERICAN PROVINCES,

Montreal, October 22, 1861.

FREDERICK W. SEWARD, Assistant Secretary of State.

DEAR SIR: Mr. Brune, a member of the Maryland Legislature, was in my office yesterday. He admits that he fled from Maryland under a feigned name, is a secessionist, &c., but is anxious to obtain his trunk which is detained at Rouse's Point. He asserts there was nothing n the trunk that can afford any evidence for or against him and is only anxious to obtain [it] on account of his wardrobe. He has friends here who are excellent Union men, and at their request I address this note asking that the trunk may be given up unless there are reasons for detaining it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. R. GIDDINGS.

FORT McHENRY, October 23, 1861.

Honorable SIMON CAMERON and Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD:

Fort McHenry is very small and is filled up by the garrison. We have not room for the accommodation of prisoners or the means of providing for their comfort. Seven prisoners of war from General Banks' column and four State prisoners engaged in secreting a balloon in Delaware came in last night. We have now over twenty confined in one room and cell.

JOHN A. DIX.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Baltimore, Md., October 28, 1861.

Honorable WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: I inclose a pamphlet containing an address by three peace nominees of Harford County. It is very impudent, but is their language such as to warrant their arrest?

I submit the question to you, and am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

TO THE PEOPLE OF HARFORD:

We have thought it best to address you explaining frankly the convictions that influence and the principles that govern us in the present crisis; principles we believe to be sound and convictions we know to be honest. Intending to adhere to them and willing to be judged by them we do not hesitate to submit our opinions unreservedly for your censure or approval.