War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0597 THE MARYLAND ARRESTS.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, September 18, 1861.

Major General JOHN E. WOOL, U. S. Army,

Commanding, &c., Fort Monroe, Va.

SIR: The general-in-chief directs that you send by the first suitable conveyance to Fort Lafayetten, N. Y., the political prisoners mentioned in your letter to the Secretary of War of the 15th instant.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, September 18, 1861.

Lieutenant Colonel MARTIN BURKE, U. S. ARMY,

Commanding, &c., Fort Hamilton, N. Y.

SIR: The general-in-chief directs me to say that orders have been sent to Major-General Wool to transfer from Fort Monroe by the first suitable conveyance Honorable Henry May, Messrs. Winans, Brown and twelve other political prisoners arrested in Baltimore to Fort Lafayette. You will please receive and hold them in custody. They will be allowed to receive no vistiros, and only to communicate on purely personal or domestic matters by letter to be inspected.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA,

Baltimore, Md., September 20, 1861.

Captain BRAGG,

Second Regiment Maryland Volunteers.

SIR: I do not wish any searches made in private dwellings by the military. I prefer it should be done by the police. You have very properly reported tome the case of Doctor Henkle and I shall put it in the hands of the provost-marshal in Baltimore. I do not wish any persons to be stopped who have shotguns and who are evidently going on sporting excursions. They should not be dtained or interfered with in any way. Your duty is to examine vihicles passing out of the city of Baltimore and suspected of having concealed arms or goods destinated to the disloayl States.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

PRIVATE.] BALTIMORE, September 23, 1861.

Honorable REVERDY JOHNSON.

MY DEAR JOHNSON: My belief is that the peace convention is defunct. Still I have taken measures to have them watched and will inform you promptly of any movement by them.

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Sincerely yours,

WM. PRICE.