War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0569 THE MARLAND ARRESTS.

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FREDERICK, May 8, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Relay House:

We are threatened with an invasion from Baltimore conjoined with traitors in our midst. We expect upward of 100 men from Baltimore to-night and their friends are preparing to meet them here. Send us 500 men by first with power to arrest and disarm. Answer immediately.

M. NELSON,

Judge of Court of Frederick County.

Extract from report of Baltimore Police Commissary of events the day following the Riot in Baltimore.

* * * The board were equally unanimous in their judgment that as good citizens it was their duty to the city and to the State of Maryland to adopt any measures whatsoever that might be necessary at such a juncture to prevent the immediate arrival in the city of further bodies of troops from the Eastern or Northern States, through the object of the latter might be solely to pass through the city. It was suggested that the most feasible if not the most practicable mode of thus stopping for a time the approach of such troops would be to obstruct the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore and the Northern Centrail Railroads by disabling some of the bridges on both roads. His honor the mayor stated to the board that his excellency the governor with whom he had a few minutes before been in consultation in the presence of several citizens concurred in these views; they were likewise those of the board and instructions were given for carrying them into effect. This was accordingly done. The injury thus done on the railroads amounted tobut a few thousand dollars on each; subsequently as has been stated further and greater damage was done to other structures on the roads by parties in the country or others, but this was without the sanction or authority of the board and they have no accurate information on the subject.

* *

CHARLES HOWARD,

President.

Extract from report of the Mayour of Baltimore.

[BALTIMORE, May 9 (?), 1861.]

TO THE HONORABLE THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND:

In the report recently made to your honorable body by the board of police commissioenrs of the city of Baltimore it is stated that in the great emergency which existed in thish ultimo it was suggested that the most feasible if not the only practicable mode of stopping for a time the approach of troops to Baltimore was to obstruct the Philadelhia, Wilmington and Baltimore and the Northern Central Railroads by disabling some of the bridges on both raods; and it is added that "his honor the mayor stated to the board that his excellency the governor with whom he had a few minutes before been in consultation in the presence of several citizens concurred in these views. "

As this concurrence has since been explicitly denied by his excellency Govenror Hicks in an official communication addressed to the