War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0307 EARLY EVENTS IN MISSOURI, ETC.

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The accused objected to the introduction of the above-mentioned extract as evidence for the reasons he stated in a paper he presents (marked F), which is attached to these proceedings. The commission being cleared for deliberation the reasons stated by the accused were dyly wieghed, the door reopened and the president announced the decision of the commission to be that so far as the extract referred to the point mentioned by the judge-advocate it was evidence and should be admitted as such.

WILLIAM SATTERWHITE, a witness for the prosecution, was duly sworn.

By the JUDGE-ADVOCATE:

Question. State your name, age, occupation and residence.

Answer. William Satterwhite is my name; age 23; clerk in a grocery in Georgetown; residence is in Georgetown, Pettis County, Mo.

Question. Have you any knowledge of any disturbance that occurred in Georgetown in which a soldier or soldiers in the U. S. service were wounded or killed? And if so state all you know about it.

Answer. I remember a disturbance occurring at Georgetown-some time about the latter part of August I think it was. I went to the door from hearing some noise in the street-did not know what it was-and saw three U. S. soldiers on horseback just coming around the corner; and I looked across the street and saw Mr. Magoffin standing riiight beside his horse-or was walking to his horse, I am not certain; but he was near his horse. I saw him raise his gun to his face and heard the report and saw it pointed in the direction of the soldiers at the place the soldiers had got to at that time. I then turned and went in the house and just as I got in the house-or a second or two after I got in the house-I heard the report of another gun when I came back to the door, but I don't know how long I was in the house. I saw a man in the act of falling off his horse; a negro was helping him off his horse. He keeled over to ne side before the negro touched him. I went over then as soon as I shut my door, and went across the street. It was somewhere near fifty yards from my door to the spot where the man was taken off his horse. When I got there he had been taken in the wagon-maker's shop and I did not get to see him. I then went from there up the street to old man Jackson's and there I found the doctor working with another man who was wounded-his name was Wheat who was wounded-and after leaving there I went home and got a pitcher of ice-water and took it back to him, and then from there I came down to the house this man was taken off his horse and they told me there he was dead. I did not get into the house or get to see him at all. I do not remember anything else that I did or saw, as by that time the whole streets were crowded with men on horseback-some our own citizens, some U. S. soldiers and some home guards. Do not know whether the men who were wounded were the men who came around the corner. The man who died there or whom I saw falling off his horse was dressed in uniform as other soldiers. The man who was wounded had his clothes off our down, and the doctor was working with him. The man was wounded in the back. There was such a crowd and I was in such a hurry that I could not tell exactly. I did not see the wound at that time, and indeed I don't know that I ever did see it although I sat up with him several nights. I was so sick when the wound was dressed I had to leave the house; or if I staind in the house I did not look at the wound. The man lived and was there over two weeks perhaps three weeks, and might have been longer, and left Georgetown. It was about two weeks it was necessary to sit up with him at night, when he got well enough to walk about the room before he left. The man wore soldier's clothes when he got well enough to walk about.

Question. Had you known the accused and had you seen him often?

Answer. I had known him at that time some eighteen months and had seen him two or three times a month.

Question. How far were you off from the accused when you saw him with his gun in hand?

Answer. I suppose I was about thirty or thirty-five yards.