War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0275 EARLY EVENTS IN MISSOURI, ETC.

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arrest. I believe he recognizes the right of the Federal military authorities to impose the oath of allegiance. At present laboring under a galling sense of mistreatment he will probably object to taking it. If he cannot be finally discharged without taking it could he not be paroled for a brief period? A little kind treatment I think would completely disarm him.

Respectfully,

C. J. CORWIN.

HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI STATE MILITIA,

Saint Louis, Mo., April 1, 1862.

Captain C. H. WARRENS, Commanding Troy, Mo.:

I am instructed by the commanding general to direct you to make the following disposition of prisoners now held by you. All those who have been in any way connected with the operations of or belong to the recent bushwhacking gang or have had anything to do with recent acts of rebellion you will send under guard to Saint Charles for trial with all the evidence you can collect in their cases. Those who have returned from Price's army or arrested for disloyal sentiments, &c., you will discharge upon their giving proper bonds and oath unless they are notoriously bad or dangerous characters. The bond you refer to is not here.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[C. W. MARSH,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI STATE MILITIA,

Saint Louis, Mo., April 2, 1862.

General BEN. LOAN, Saint Joseph, Mo.:

Evidence having been brought to the commanding general that Mr. H. L. Routt, of Liberty, was promised by General Prentiss that if he would sigh a pledge to remain at home a law-abiding citizen he should not be subject to arrest and that he did give such pledge to Major James at Liberty on 1st of February last he desires that you send to him the charges against Mr. Routt and the names of witnesses.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[C. W. MARSH,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SAINT LOUIS, April 4, 1862.

Honorable EDWARD BATES, Attorney-General.

DEAR SIR: The spring term of the United States circuit court is now approaching and I write to obtain from you an official letter making some suggestions or rather giving some instructions as to the course which ought to be pursued by the civil authorities here concerning those who have been indicted either for treason or conspiracy. There is no doubt but that the amnesty held out by the governor under the direction of the convention has induced many to return sincerely to their allegiance and this may and doubtless does embrace some who have been indicted. There are some cases where they have returned and taken the steps prescribed by the military authorities and in those