War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0271 EARLY EVENTS IN MISSOURI, ETC.

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It must of course rest with the military authorities to decide after a full knowledge of the case whether a prisoner who has surrendered himself voluntarily can be released on any terms, and no promise of release can be given before arrest or surrender unless the character and conduct of the party is known.

Those who commit acts of rebellion and insurrection within the territory occupied by our troops are not entitled to be treated even as prisoners of war and probably will not be much longer. If the influential secessionists want to preserve peace and save their delunded friends from severe punishment they may as well take the fact above mentioned as the basis of their actions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General.

OFFIECE OF PROVOST-MARSCHAL-GENERAL,

DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, March 17, 1862.

Major JOHN Y. CLOPPER,

Commanding Post at Sturgeon.

MAJOR: The assistant adjutant-general at headquarters has referred your letter* of the 14th instant to this office for reply. The taking an oath and giving a bond is not designed to operate as an amnesty for irregular warfare, bridge-burning, robbing, &c. Such persons are not to be discharged on oath and bond; only such as have been engaged in regular warfare are to be thus released. The oath taken by Burks and the bond given by him are no protection to him for offenses such as bridge-burning. Arrest him, examine the witnesses and report their evidence fully to this office and hold him for further orders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. G. FARRAR,

Provost-Marshal-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTHWEST MISSOURI,

Saint Joseph, Mo., March 18,186.

General J. M. SCHOFIELD, Saint Louis, Mo.

GENERAL: Late last night Colonel Catherwood returned from Liberty. In a conversation had with him I learn that the bandit, Quantrill, severely-perhaps mortally-wounded two recruits in the Missouri State militia of those at Liberty. One was delibarately shot in cold blood after he had been taken as a prisoner. Eight were taken off as prisoners. The flag raised by General Prentiss was torn down and a secession one hoisted. Quantrill recrossed into Jackson County. Colonel Catherwood tore down the rebel flag and ran up the stars and stripes in its place. He left about forty-five men, part of Captain Johnos's company, in Liberty; the remainder would be ordered there to-day. I also learn from Colonel Catherwood that Parker stopped the steam-boat Rowena and after examining the manifest and finding the principal part of the cargo shipped to Messrs. - - he selected about six dozen pairs of boots and some other articles which he took and then permitted the boat to resume her trip. Colonel Catherwood

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*Not found.

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