War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0152 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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if necessary send them to this place. You will keep distinct lists of both classes for reference, and make records of the oaths and paroles of the former class for evidence against any one violating them.

Very respectfully, your most obedient,

GEO. W. CULLUM,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Fort Scott, Kans., December 13, 1861.

Major General STERLING PRICE, Missouri State Guard.

SIR: On the 7th day of December, A. D. 1861, B. F. Potter, Charles Harding, James N. Bittle, John C. Allsup, were taken prisoners by a Montevallo company on Clear Creek. I think the company was commanded by one Captain Gatewood. The prisoners were at a house on said creek, three of them in charge of one very sick man, viz, B. F. Potter, when they were taken. I have some prisoners here whom I will exchange for those men-one for one. I have had here in the last three months at least 200 prisoners amongst whom were several officers all of whom I have released, some unconditionally and some on parole for exchange; amongst whom is the son of Colonel Rossed who is on parole for exchange, whom you desired to have exchanged in your note to General Lane sometime since. You will confer a favor by forwarding the prisoners to this post by one man with a flag of truce.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. JUDSON,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI,

Syracuse, December 14, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

A large number of immigrants driven from Southwest Missouri are arriving here and to Otterville utterly destitute. Unless something be done for them they must perish of starvation and exposure. There is no means here to shelter them nor provide for them. I can issue them rations, which in fact I must do or see them perish, but no shelter can be found for them. It seems to be absolutely necessary for the Government to provide for these people during the winter at least. If I were in the neighborhood of any considerable town I would quarter them on the inhabitants, but this section of the country is sparsely populated and already nearly exhausted of supplies. Some speedy action ought to be taken in relation to these unfortunate people.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

[JOHN POPE,]

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

Saint Louis, December 14, 1861.

S. HATCH, Provost-Marshal, Saint Joseph, Mo.

SIR: Your communication of the 8th instant advising me of your appointment of the office of provost-marshal of Saint Joseph, Mo., has been received. Until full and explicit instructions are sent for your