War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0142 PRISONERS OF WAR, ETC.

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the service of the United States or not? This is asked in reference to Colonel Mulligan's regiment but it is desired the decision should apply to all similar cases.

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS TWENTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT,

December 13, 1861.

[Major General JOHN POPE.]

GENERAL: Some days ago I addressed a letter to General Halleck in regard to sixty-two men belonging to my regiment who were taken prisoners and made to take an oath not to take up arms against the Southern Confederacy. These men at that time were at Benton Barracks. On the 11th instant they reached this point and reported that General Strong ordered them to this place to be mustered out and decline doing duty. Will you please inform me what course to pursue in regard to them as my letter to the department has not been answered.

Very respectfully,

HENRY G. KENNETT,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Twenty-seventh Ohio.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS,

Sedalia, Mo., December 13, 1861.

Respectfully referred to headquarters of the department with the recommendation that orders may be given to muster these men out of the service.

FRED K. STEELE,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, December 17, 1861.

Colonel F. STEELE, Commanding, &c., Sedalia.

COLONEL: The commanding general directs that you have mustered out of the service and discharged those men of the Twenty-seventh Ohio Regiment who are now under parole.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM McMICHAEL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

BIRD'S POINT, MO., December 18, 1861.

Adjutant-General KELTON.

DEAR SIR: On the 20th of September last seven of the twelve companies composing the First Illinois Cavalry (Colonel Marshal) surrendered themselves prisoners of war at Lexington and with them were all of the field and staff of said regiment. The non-commissioned officers