War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0051 THE TEXAS SURRENDER.

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It is further stipulated and greed to that all the officers and men who shall give their paroles and oaths as above stated shall be allowed to pass unmolested through the Confederate States of America, by the way of Galveston and up the Mississippi River, to any point they may see fit go within the limits of the United States of America, or by any other route they may see fit to take.

C. C. SIBLEY,

Major Third Infantry, Commanding Troops.

EARL VAN DORN,

Colonel, C. S. Army, Commanding Troops.

[Inclosure Numbers 2.]

Copy of parole given by the officers.

SALURIA, TEX., April 25, 1861.

TO THE AUTHORITIES OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA:

I give my word of honor as an officer and gentleman that I will not bear arms nor exercise any of the functions of my office under my commission from the President of the United States against the Confederate States of America during the existence of the war between the said Confederate and United States unless I shall be exchanged for another prisoners or prisoners of war, or unless I shall be released by the President of the Confederate States. In consideration of the above parole it is understood that I am free to go and come whenever I may see fit, except that I shall not attempt to enter or depart from any fort, camp or garrison of the Confederate States without the sanction of its commanding officer.

C. C. SIBLEY,

Major Third Infantry, U. S. Army.

[Inclosure Numbers 3.]

Copy of oath taken by the enlisted men.

SALURIA, TEX., April 26, 1861.

TO THE AUTHORITIES OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA:

We do solemnly swear that we will not bear arms against the Confederate States of America, nor in any way give aid and comfort to the United States against the Confederate States, during the existence of the war between the said United States and Confederate States, unless we shall be duly exchanged for other prisoners of war, or until we shall be released by the President of the ConfIn consideration of this oath, it is understood that we are free to go wherever we may see fit.

KANKAKEE CITY, ILL., June 18, 1861.

Colonel L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to report my arrival at this place yesterday, the 17th instant, having come from San Antonio, Tex., with as much dispatch as the means of travel and communication would permit, leaving that place on the 4th.