War of the Rebellion: Serial 114 Page 0039 THE TEXAS SURRENDER.

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Surrender of the U. S. Troops to the Confederate Forces as Prisoner of War.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS,

San Antonio, April 17, 1861.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that a force of Texas State troops is now assembled in this city, and I have this evening learned that the officers, &c., here stationed will be arrested to-morrow and held as prisoners of war. Two transports have sailed with troops, and it is hoped and expected that the third, the Star of the West, will sail in a day or two with the whole force now in camp at Green Lake. There will then remain seven companies of the Eighth Infantry, numbering, say, 370, the headquarters of that regiment, and the headquarters of the department. The Eighth Infantry will not reach Indianola, before the 10th of May, if permitted to proceed to the coast. This, of course requires that a fourth transport should be sent out for the embarkation of these troops.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. A. WAITE,

Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

HDQRS. BATTLN. FIRST, THIRD, AND EIGHTH INFANTRY,

Saluria, Tex., April 25, 1861.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have this morning surrendered this battalion, consisting of two companies of the First Infantry, with the adjutant and non-commissioned staff and band of the same regiment, three companies of the Third and two companies of the Eighth Infantry, including nine officers, to the forces of the Confederate States under the command of Colonel Earl Van Dorn.

Two unsuccessful attempts have been made by me to escape with this command, the Star of the West (transport) having been captured before we were able to reach her anchorage, off Matagorda Bay, and on the night of the 24th of April three steamers, having some 800 men and some pieces of artillery on board, coming down the bay, and taking up such a position as to prevent our retreat in the two small schooners in which we were endeavoring to make our escape, and a fourth steamer, with some 400 men, one 24 and two 6 pounder pieces of artillery, having early in the morning of the 25th taken up a position to prevent our escape by running out of the bay, I was obliged to capitulate under the most favorable terms which I could obtain.

The shores of this bay are extremely low and partially inundated, and the channel seems to be nearly one mile from the land. The pilots have constantly refused us both information and material assistance.

It is extremely unfortunate that the steamer Mohawk had left the coast at this time, as its presence might have saved us from this humiliating disaster.

It affords me pleasure, great pleasure, to state the officers and men of my command have shown the most unwavering loyalty to the Government, the men, with two exceptions, having taken the oath necessary for their return to the United States.