War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0983 Chapter LXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--CONFEDERATE.

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line. The enemy were repulsed. A solid shot killed General Breckinridge's horse, and the fall of the horse injured General Breckinridge slightly. The second attack was upon General Hoke's line. The enemy were repulsed. No further report has been received.

Respectfully,

WM. H. PALMER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Our skirmishers are well in front of Mahone and Hoke, and intrenched.

[36.]

JUNE 3, [1864]--5.30 a. m.

Colonel W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: Yesterday evening, after arranging my line and placing General Wilcox in position and shelling Spencer's Hill, I reported for the occasion to General Hill, who appeared on the ground. I presume he has given you the result of the operations. Early this morning the enemy attacked in heavy force a salient on the left of my line and carried the front of three companies, but the colors of the regiment did not leave the works, and very soon the line was retaken, with some loss to enemy, by the Maryland battalion, of my command, and Finegan's brigade, of General Mahone's division.

Respectfully,

JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE.

[36.]

JUNE 3, 1864--9 a. m.

Colonel W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have one correction to make in my note of this morning. The enemy broke through the front of one battalion, bayoneting the commanding officer and capturing most of the men in the trenches. We have perhaps an equal number of prisoners and at least 200 of their dead lie within and without our works. In other respects my note was accurate.

Respectfully,

JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Major-General.

I see no movement on my right, which is occupied by Wilcox.

[36.]

HEADQUARTERS BRECKINRIDGE'S COMMAND,

June 3, 1864--9.30 p. m.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

About dark, as the left of General Breckinridge's line and the right of General Finegan's were advancing for the purpose of establishing a skirmish line, they met the enemy advancing and drove him back. A satisfactory line of skirmishers has been established. In the engagement General Breckinridge's horse was killed by a cannon shot and in the fall he received a bruise which will probably prevent his taking the