War of the Rebellion: Serial 109 Page 0830 Chapter LXIII. MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.

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[Inclosure.]

WILMINGTON, N. C., March 9, 1864.

General COOPER:

Your telegram received. The steamer Hansa is now at the quartermaster's wharf under my control. I had turned the marine guard off from her, but without collision or difficulty. I have sent an aide to the President with the correspondence in this matter and with the request that Captai Lynch be withdrawn from this command.

W. H. C. WHITING,

Major-General.

[33.]

WESTMORELAND COUNTY, March 9, 1864.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: We learn here from various sources that the enemy have constructed at Point Lookout a number of large boats with sixteen oars for some secret expedition. A man from this neighborgood (well known to me) reports that, having been captured in crossing the Potomac, he was employed wihilst a prisoner with a great number of hands in muffling oars for these boats. No doubt is entertained of these facts, but none seem to know the destination of the boats. Some suppose them designed for Charleston; others suppose they ; may be intended to pass the obstructions at Drewry's Bluff, with the view of flanking the fortifications. I deem it my duty to give the Government this information.

Yours, truly,

WILLOUGHBY NEWTON.

[Indorsement.]

MARCH 16, 1864.

Respectfully referred to General Bragg for information.

The writer is a gentleman of high character, intelligence, and influence, and of unquestionable loyalty to our cause; resides in the northern part Westmoreland County, Va.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

[33.]

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Raleigh, March 9, 1864.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS,

Richmond, Va.:

SIR: Your letter of the 29th ultimo has been received. Several portions of it were read with anything but pleasure, as it was very far from my intention in my letter of the 9th ultimo to raise any issue of a disagreeable and unprofitable character with you. Before proceeding to the specifications you invite me to make in support of my statements in the letter of the 9th of February, I desire especially to correct your apprehensions in regard to the fifth item of your letter, when quoting from my letter, "I do not hold you responsible for all the petty annoyances, the insolence of office, under which our people lose heart and patience." You say "I make no comment on this language, as I must suppose that you deem it becoming our mutual positions, and simply invite you to state what portion of these petty annoyances and